Matthew Sexton profile picture

Matthew Sexton Psychotherapy, LCSW

Not Taking New Clients

Matthew Sexton uses mindfulness, acceptance and commitment therapy, CBT, and motivational interviewing to help clients develop coping skills that will reduce stress and lead to improved coping, communication, and happiness. He specializes in working with clients who are dealing with anxiety, codependency, relationships, and stress disorders associated with past traumas.

Specialties
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Life Transitions
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
  • Men’s Mental Health
  • Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $80-140
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Out-of-pocket
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“For the most part, we are all good people trying to make our way the best we can in an irrational world; we’re making the best rational decisions we can at the moment.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
In looking at life as if we are traveling on a journey, there is a start and an end; it is the middle where we find the challenges. For all of us, this journey is unique: We choose our own paths and take on our own unique quests with challenges, twists, and turns influencing our thoughts and emotions. When we don’t have the right coping skills, we feel unprepared for the journey. We are unable to handle the quest and we fester in our own negativity. Within acute mental health, substance abuse, healthcare, and private settings, I have empowered people so that they can recognize their thoughts and feelings and change their reaction to them, leading to improved goal attainment.
What should someone know about working with you?
I work with motivated clients who understand that life is full of ups and downs and those looking to overcome their personal resistance to achieve their goals. My process starts by learning about the brain, how it works, and what it is doing and then exploring the skills you have in your toolbox to cope with the way your brain is designed. Once we develop coping skills, we can then start to unpack thoughts, feelings, and experiences, allowing us to move forward. I do not consider implementing coping skills homework; I look at it as motivation to engage in positive change.
How do your core values shape your approach to therapy?
I feel that I have learned how to empower myself to commit to positive change and that I can empower others to do the same. In my opinion, there is nothing more important than the individual (our sense of self). For the most part, we are all good people trying to make our way the best we can in an irrational world; we’re making the best rational decisions we can at the moment. By improving how we make these rational decisions and aligning them to our personal values, we can improve our happiness.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
I really like telehealth because it gives us all a lot more flexibility. In the future, I would like to use it and develop a more visual approach to therapy that does not work as well in an in-person setting.
“By improving how we make these rational decisions and aligning them to our personal values, we can improve our happiness.”