Matthew Witter profile picture

Matthew Witter Psychotherapy, PsyD

Not Taking New Clients

Dr. Matthew Witter is a psychologist, adjunct professor, and life coach with several years of clinical experience. He specializes in working with clients with anxiety and depression as well as the LGBTQ/queer community and those with other marginalized identities. He employs a supportive, engaging, and collaborative style to empower his clients to reach their full potential.

Dr. Matthew Witter is a psychologist, adjunct professor, and life coach with several years of clinical experience. He specializes in working with clients with anxiety and depression as well as the LGBTQ/queer community and those with other marginali…

Dr. Matthew Witter is a psychologist, adjunct professor, and life coach with several years of clinical experience. He specializes in working with clients with anxiety and depression as well as the LGBTQ/queer community and those with other marginalized identities. He employs a supportive, engaging, and collaborative style to empower his clients to reach their full potential.

Specialties
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Depression
  • Life Transitions
  • Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
  • LGBTQIA+
Pay with insurance
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • AllSavers UHC
  • Harvard Pilgrim
Pay out-of-pocket
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $200-260
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New Jersey
  • New York
mic icon
Provider
Profile
“I believe every client can succeed, and I think of myself as a fellow traveler on your adventure of self-actualization and growth.”
What was your path to becoming a Licensed Psychologist?
I have always loved getting to know people. I knew I wanted to help people and was good at understanding them. As someone who has a physical disability, I learned to stand up for myself, express my needs, and initiate social interaction. I took this approach of getting to know people into my adult life and gravitated toward the helping professions. As I started my psychology training, I enjoyed getting to know the inner workings of my clients and helping them overcome mental blocks and create actions for positive growth and development. I have worked in many settings, including residential treatment, head start programs, school-based mental health, intensive outpatient programs, primary care practice, skilled nursing facilities, college counseling, and private practice. It’s nice to work at a job I love and help facilitate fulfillment in other people’s lives.
What should someone know about working with you?
I meet the client where they are, and my initial goal is to provide a brave place to help clients identify what they want to change in their lives and the goals to make this a reality. I believe every client can succeed, and I think of myself as a fellow traveler on your adventure of self-actualization and growth. I use a culturally-competent, integrative style, pulling from multiple interventions, to give my clients a treatment that aligns with their goals. I may ask more in-depth questions to understand my clients better and, at times, will provide active homework. I approach therapy as a collaborative relationship where the client is an expert on their life and I utilize my knowledge of psychological principles. I provide an environment of warmth, safety, trust, and always a little humor. My job is never to judge but help my clients understand what they want out of life.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
As therapy becomes more accessible, the mode of treatment is changing. Clinicians understand that most therapeutic approaches were created by White men. These approaches frequently evolved from a Westernized worldview and do not always align with the goals of marginalized people, especially Black, Indigenous, people of color (BIPOC). Cultural competence is something I strive for, and I work to be aware of the implicit biases I grew up with. As an educator and psychologist, I am encouraged by how diverse our field is becoming. I enjoy reading about and discussing how clinicians can adapt treatment to help all people and be more flexible in treating clients different from them.
Have you done any research-based work that you found particularly exciting? How does it inform your practice today?
My dissertation looked at the lived experiences of gay men with physical disabilities. I researched their experiences of having a disability since they were children and later coming out as gay. I was curious about the intersection of multiple minority identities and what experiences the men may have had in their families and society. My research participants were all from different parts of the country yet had similar experiences of discrimination and oppression, specifically within their own families! This research has increased my interest in intersectionality and what identities we find the most salient. I believe it is imperative to understand my clients’ intersecting identities so I can further tailor treatment to what is most distressing. The identities we hold dictate how we are treated in society.
“I provide an environment of warmth, safety, trust, and always a little humor.”