Nadia Fiorita profile picture

Nadia Fiorita Psychotherapy, LCSW

Not Taking New Clients

Nadia Fiorita is a clinical psychotherapist with over ten years of experience helping adolescents and adults overcome challenging times in their lives. She specializes in anxiety, depression, relationship challenges, and trauma. Nadia understands the courage it takes to seek support, honors the therapeutic relationship, and strives to create an empathetic, caring environment.

Specialties
  • General Mental Health
  • Life Transitions
  • Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $200-260
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Harvard Pilgrim
  • Out-of-pocket
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • Connecticut
  • Florida
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Provider
Profile
“We will often check in with one another about the process and the progress, as I believe it is important for both client and clinician to understand how you will feel and how your life will look once you have achieved your therapeutic goals.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
Psychotherapy has always been my main career, although I did obtain my undergraduate degree in business administration from UCONN. While in college, I realized that I had a strong passion for human development, behavior, psychology. and family systems and I set a goal of having a private practice where I could really help individuals and families. The drive came from my own upbringing and wanting to understand how it shaped who I was as a person. Through my own work, I realized how my empathetic nature and ability to hold others’ struggles in a nonjudgmental way makes me a great listener and clinician. In my first clinical job, I was very involved in a trauma program that our behavioral health clinic implemented in our community for children and families; this guided my clinical work in helping those who have experienced trauma and helped me realize how many of us go through those experiences carrying so much shame.
What should someone know about working with you?
My intake process entails an initial consultation where I am able to better understand your motivation and main reasons for seeking help as well as gauge whether you and I would be a good fit in working together. I have participated in various trainings that I have connected with as a clinician and strive to adapt a personalized approach with my clients depending on their needs and goals. We will spend time discussing and identifying your short-term and long-term goals and how to best make them a reality. We will often check in with one another about the process and the progress, as I believe it is important for both client and clinician to understand how you will feel and how your life will look once you have achieved your therapeutic goals. I strive to provide an empathetic and compassionate environment where you feel open and able to share and I understand how powerful the therapeutic relationship is.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
I am all about continuing my education and training as a clinician. I think it is so important to seek out ways to learn more and participate in trainings to broaden my own knowledge and skills. Right now, I'm loving self-compassion work and feel it is such an important intervention we can use. I also love consulting with other clinicians, both less and more experienced than I am, in order to obtain support and explore other perspectives on how to best treat clients. This is another amazing opportunity to learn about my own work and those of others.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
I really believe that mental health is becoming more acceptable to speak about and we are realizing the importance of our mental health on our overall wellbeing and health. Especially during challenging times, as we see so many suffering and experiencing greater levels of anxiety, stress, and depression, it is so important for us to talk about mental health without the stigma because we all go through difficult times and need others for support and love. I'm also excited about how technology will continue to change our industry! Mental health services are better able to reach a greater number of people and innovation helps people through things like phone applications and more.
What is a barrier for people seeking mental health counseling?
What is a barrier for people seeking mental health counseling? I think there are many barriers to seeking care but a big one is that many people aren't really sure what to expect in working with a clinician. So, they fear it may be too overwhelming or the therapist may be too judgmental or not know how to help them. They are afraid of what others will think if they do seek therapy. Even though the stigma appears to be less now, that fear still exists. And I think people are very busy and stressed out and may not realize the value that therapy provides. I truly see it as making an investment in your health, the same as you would if you are going to seek medical help. It is that important!
“I strive to provide an empathetic and compassionate environment where you feel open and able to share and I understand how powerful the therapeutic relationship is.”