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Neta Korem Psychotherapy, LCSW

Neta Korem is an LCSW in Connecticut. Her approach to psychotherapy combines cognitive behavioral therapy and psychodynamic principles. She believes that the treatment should be tailored individually to each person according to their specific needs and abilities. She also believes that the most important thing in therapy is creating a relationship based on trust and clarity.

Specialties
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Depression
  • Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
  • Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Pay with insurance
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Cigna
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
Pay out-of-pocket
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $80-140
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • Connecticut
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Provider
Profile
“A large part of my professional career was in the Israel Defense Forces and veterans affairs office, where I worked with clients from diverse backgrounds (culturally and economically).”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I always had the deepest interest in people, their feelings, and their experiences as well as the will to help them improve their lives. I studied social work to acquire as many tools as possible and build my knowledge so I could help people in the most effective way. Years ago, I started as a mental health officer in the Israel Defense Forces. I worked with new recruits during this stressful transition. I helped recruits who suffered from anxiety, depression, and personality disorders. I went on to work with parolees and veterans who suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder, addiction, anxiety, and depression. The path I took allowed me to take many courses to enrich my knowledge. I now run a private clinic and work with people of all backgrounds who are coping with the aforementioned issues as well as relationship difficulties. I offer a therapeutic experience built on trust and acceptance that leads to significant improvements in people's lives.
What should someone know about working with you?
If you decide to come and work with me, I will try to create a safe, nonjudgmental environment where you can open up and feel free to share your deepest thoughts. During the intake, I will mostly listen and allow you to express your needs and expectations. I will help you by asking leading questions and we will create a plan together and set goals for treatment. Based on the goals we set, I will choose the method of care and what expertise to utilize.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
Throughout my professional career, I have attained expertise in psychodynamic therapy, CBT, and DBT. My work with people with PTSD led me to specialize in trauma-focused therapies, such as prolonged exposure. Today, I continue to study various courses in the cognitive behavioral approach. I find that my roots in psychodynamic therapy combined with cognitive techniques help me tailor a case-specific approach to each client. I am actively taking part in seminars and lectures and reading current literature on evidence-based therapy for mental disorders. I believe that the ongoing learning process is vital to my ability to give you the best care possible.
How do your core values shape your approach to therapy?
A large part of my professional career was in the Israel Defense Forces and veterans affairs office, where I worked with clients from diverse backgrounds (culturally and economically). This experience helped me understand how to approach cultural as well as gender issues in a sensitive and accepting manner. I worked with each client to identify their personal beliefs and values and build a treatment plan well-suited to their needs and capabilities. When I migrated to the US, the experience of living in a new place with a different culture helped me connect on a more personal level with clients who felt as though they didn’t belong. I now feel I am more appreciative of the nuances of each person's unique experiences.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
Online therapy is now common for those who experience anxiety when meeting people in person and those who do not have the access or time to see in-person therapists. I feel that the accessibility of online therapy and the ability to combine it with the client's lifestyle in a pleasant and comfortable environment is helpful and allows us to build the foundation for successful treatment.
“This experience helped me understand how to approach cultural as well as gender issues in a sensitive and accepting manner.”
Interested in speaking with Neta?