Nick Goodness, LCSW
Nick Goodness profile picture

Nick Goodness

Psychotherapy, LCSW

Nick Goodness is a psychotherapist who works with men and those who want to improve their relationships with men. He helps his clients challenge problematic thought patterns and dysfunctional relationship dynamics in a pragmatic, hands-on, and relational manner. In his practice, Nick strives to always affirm the identities of people of color and LGBTQIA+ individuals.
Specialties
General Mental Health
LGBTQ
Men's Issues
Finances
$ $ $ $ $
$200-260
Sliding Scale
A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
UnitedHealthcare
Oxford Health Plans
Oscar
Out-of-pocket
portrait photograph of provider
Provider
Profile
“Our work together is to develop and amplify your own voice, and to help articulate that perspective in the familial, social, and professional relationships you find important.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I knew from an early age that I wanted to help people. Growing up, I was exposed to a wide variety of people from a wide variety of backgrounds. I developed a strong belief in the importance of withholding judgment, listening carefully, and having compassion for ourselves—as well as for others. Prior professional roles in public interest law and education have only strengthened this conviction, and it continues to inform each of my clinical relationships today.
What should someone know about working with you?
I offer you a sounding board and my input, but I wholeheartedly believe that you are the ultimate expert and the only person who can determine what is right for you. Our work together is to develop and amplify your own voice, and to help articulate that perspective in the familial, social, and professional relationships you find important.
Nick Goodness photo 1
How does collaboration with other providers inform your work?
I believe that collaboration—whether it’s with clients, psychiatric providers, or others—is at the heart of every therapeutic relationship. We all live in relation to others—our partners, relatives, colleagues—and each of us can only see a part of the greater picture. Only when we connect and share our perspectives can we build and strengthen our understanding.
What advice would you give to someone who is hesitant to try therapy?
Meeting with me, or any therapist, is just that: a meeting. While the hope is that we can build a supportive and lasting therapeutic relationship, that’s not always the case. I want you to find a therapist who can support you in the ways you need to be supported.
How did you come to specialize in working with men?
Growing up in a family with all boys, I am particularly attuned to the needs and concerns of men. Many of the concerns facing men—intimacy challenges, relationship difficulties, and blocks in communication—are issues I’ve personally navigated or encountered through friends, relatives, or clients. I work with each client to develop a secure, attuned, and open therapeutic relationship that can serve as a model for building healthier relationships outside the therapeutic context.
“I work with each client to develop a secure, attuned, and open therapeutic relationship that can serve as a model for building healthier relationships outside the therapeutic context.”
Interested in speaking with Nick?