Nina Gottlieb profile picture

Nina Gottlieb Psychotherapy, PsyD

Nina Gottlieb is a psychodynamic therapist. She works collaboratively with clients to help manage emotions, explore life struggles, identify patterns, and make connections to the past. This process leads to healing and better self-understanding. Her approach to therapy is informed by mindfulness and evidence-based treatment modalities, including ACT and CBT.

Specialties
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Depression
  • Grief and Loss
  • Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • Empire Blue Cross Blue Shield
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Out-of-pocket
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“I believe that the most important things a psychotherapist does are provide a safe space for self-expression and make a person feel heard.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I was voted “Most Likely to Become a Therapist” when I was in middle school. Throughout my life, I have always gravitated toward listening to and supporting others. I believe that the most important things a psychotherapist does are provide a safe space for self-expression and make a person feel heard.
What should someone know about working with you?
The decision to come to therapy is very personal, and everyone has unique experiences to share. No difficulty is too big or small to bring to therapy. I collaboratively establish treatment goals based on what the client wishes to work through. Over the course of the work, I serve as a guide for self-exploration and help identify painful or maladaptive patterns. Progress in therapy can look different for different people. Often, progress can show up as the ability to recognize and sit with emotions, identify patterns of thinking and behavior, and engage in value-guided behavior. I typically work with people who are looking to improve their relationships or career, feeling stuck, or experiencing anxiety or depression.
Nina Gottlieb photo 1
What is the typical length of time a person should spend in therapy?
I see people for short-term and long-term treatment, depending on therapy goals. Often, I find that it can take time to build a relationship and the trust necessary to facilitate open self-exploration. Together, we can determine the pacing of psychotherapy and openly discuss progress along the way.
“I typically work with people who are looking to improve their relationships or career, feeling stuck, or experiencing anxiety or depression.”
Interested in speaking with Nina?