Nina Werman
Nina Werman profile picture

Nina Werman

Vedic Meditation

Nina Werman is a teacher of the Vedic meditation practice, a simple yet powerful technique for dissolving stress in people with full lives and busy schedules. Regular practice of VM reduces stress and anxiety, and improves sleep quality, adaptive energy, creative intelligence, productivity, and overall well-being. Nina’s certification was completed in NYC and northern India.
Specialties
General Mental Health
Life Coaching
Sleep Issues
Locations
Downtown Brooklyn
Alma Office
Finances
$ $ $ $ $
$200-260
Cash
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Provider
Profile
“Meditation works beautifully in tandem with, or as a complement to different modalities for self-reflection and understanding.”
What was your path to becoming a meditation teacher?
I discovered Vedic meditation in 2013 when I was working tirelessly on my retail business—viewing the grind-it-out mentality as a prerequisite for entrepreneurship and city life. Desperately seeking a sense of serenity to balance out an unshakable blend of stress, anxiety, and low-grade depression, I signed up for an introductory course. After just two weeks of regular practice of Vedic meditation, the positive shift within me was palpable. Life is still full of demand, but my experience of and reactions to life are now tempered by a deep inner contentment that was only revealed by my Vedic practice. I'm inspired and compelled to share the gifts of this technique with others.
What should someone know about working with you?
My course is structured into four consecutive sessions in private or in a group setting. I provide a free consultation to share the tenets and mechanics of the practice so prospective students can determine if it’s a good fit. Students graduate with a self-sufficient, daily practice. As this practice evolves, questions will likely come up and adjustments may be needed. Included with the course is an invitation to attend weekly group meditations that I or any of my colleagues hold here and outside of NYC, as well as a lifetime of free follow-up courses. If a student falls off of the practice and needs a refresher, my course and any other Vedic teachers’ courses are available for free for life.
Nina Werman photo 1
How does collaboration with other providers inform your work?
I find that students who are or have been in therapy have developed tools for understanding the insights and progressive change that result from a regular meditation practice. The same goes for regular meditators who try therapy—it expedites the process and progress for the client. In short, meditation works beautifully in tandem with, or as a complement to different modalities for self-reflection and understanding.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
It excites me that the social stigma of mental health has moved into what feels like a cultural curiosity and exploration of resources for overall well-being—especially in the face of the rise of reported generalized anxiety and depression. With apps like Headspace and Insight Timer, meditation has become ubiquitous within a holistic approach to mental and emotional wellness. I’m honored to be of service in moving the needle even further by giving my students the gift of a completely self-sufficient meditation practice.
What would you say to someone who resists meditation because they either can’t find the time or they have too many thoughts to “quiet the mind”?
It’s a common misconception that meditation means we rid the mind of thoughts, when, in truth, thoughts are very much a part of meditation. Wherever we can think, we can meditate. I promise students that once their practice takes hold, finding the time will feel about as challenging as finding time to brush your teeth—so much so that you’ll feel like you’re missing out if you skip it. That said, forming any habit takes an initial non-negotiable commitment. I encourage students to take the course when they’re ready to commit to a few weeks of non-negotiable sessions, and I work with students to look at their individual schedules to carve out practice time each day.
“It’s a common misconception that meditation means we rid the mind of thoughts, when, in truth, thoughts are very much a part of meditation.”
Interested in speaking with Nina?