Paula Feirstein, LCSW
Paula Feirstein profile picture

Paula Feirstein

Psychotherapy, LCSW

Paula Feirstein is an experienced therapist with years of clinical practice helping those who want to make two kinds of change: They want to feel differently about themselves and they want to enhance their relationships. In her sessions, clients come to understand themselves better and discover how to make the shifts in their lives that get them closer to their goals.
Specialties
General Mental Health
Personal Growth
Relationship Issues
Finances
$ $ $ $ $
$200-260
Sliding Scale
A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
UnitedHealthcare
Oxford Health Plans
Oscar
Out-of-pocket
portrait photograph of provider
Provider
Profile
“My work is geared to understanding your struggles as you see them and my first job is to help you develop a picture of how you want to shift the challenges in your life.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
In my 35 years as a therapist, I have trained in relational therapy, trauma work, and interpersonal therapy; I have worked with couples, parents and their adult children, and adult siblings who needed help reworking their relationships. I have followed the evolution of psychotherapy, moving my practice with the developments in brain research. Guided by developments in neuroscience today, we better understand that each individual's unique experiences create their personality, shape how they face challenges, influence how they cope with stress, and remain as reserves for their abilities to heal and love. We now know that, as deeply embedded as these qualities are, a safe therapeutic relationship can create and nurture change.
What should someone know about working with you?
Your concerns guide our first meetings; after two sessions, we will know if we are a good fit for the co-creation of your therapy. My work is geared to understanding your struggles as you see them and my first job is to help you develop a picture of how you want to shift the challenges in your life. Connecting in the safe space I create allows you to engage with ideas that emerge from our work together; this dialogue helps you form new ways of thinking about yourself and the relationships that are most important to you.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
My work includes ongoing study. As part of a field based on evolving brain science, I have the opportunity to continue to build an ever-better model of how the mind is formed and how it can change. Having the ability to use this model for the benefit of my clients has made this profession deeply rewarding for the past 35 years.
How do your own core values shape your approach to therapy?
of modern neuroscience. Research tells us that the brain is shaped by emotional experiences starting from early in life and recent developments demonstrate that the brain is able to change as new experiences occur. In a safe therapeutic relationship, opportunities present for the emergence of new ways of thinking about oneself; this deeply affects how we feel and gives us choices in our relationships with others.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
We have seen more recognition of the need for greater access to mental health resources and for emotional support since the COVID-19 pandemic. The visible stress on health care providers opened the public to the need for responsiveness and management of mental health. I feel privileged to provide these services with my experience and abilities.
Have you done any research-based work that you found particularly exciting? How does it inform your practice today?
While working on the Traumatic Stress Team at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, I participated in research comparing modes of therapy used with trauma victims. As a faculty, we received training from leading researchers in the trauma field who presented evidence-based practice from their own work. This immersion in trauma treatment impacted my work with all of my clients and enriched my own working model with current neuroscience developments, which I have been able to apply to my practice.
“In a safe therapeutic relationship, opportunities present for the emergence of new ways of thinking about oneself; this deeply affects how we feel and gives us choices in our relationships with others.”
Interested in speaking with Paula?