Peter Curkendall profile picture

Peter Curkendall Psychotherapy, LMHC

Peter Curkendall assists people in learning how to find purpose on purpose and with purpose through evidence-based therapy. He believes therapy helps relieve the problem of human suffering. It’s about reaching beyond suffering to get back to really living and a place where you can find yourself asking, “What do I really want my life to be about?”

Specialties
  • General Mental Health
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Depression
  • Domestic Abuse and Violence
  • Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Pay with insurance
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • AllSavers UHC
  • Harvard Pilgrim
Pay out-of-pocket
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“I am an active, person-centered, and focused therapist who finds value in working with a broad range of clients, from those seeking small changes in their lives to those who have experienced severe trauma.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
As someone who, at times, felt lost and unmotivated, I was always able to find a friend, a mentor, a counselor, or someone who would lend an ear, a shoulder, or some solid advice. I noticed that everyone did not have the extended support network that I was afforded. As I became older, I decided to go back and get a degree in counseling so I would be able to help a diverse range of folks. As my own blended family grew to a wife, six beautiful children (four adopted and medically fragile), dogs, and myself, I needed to be able to give equal attention to my family and my life as a therapist. This led me to begin my own private practice where I would be able to be fully devoted to the people who mean the most to me, which are my family, friends, and the clients I serve.
What should someone know about working with you?
As a therapist, I tend to take an integrative and personalized approach, which is founded on evidence-based therapeutic models coupled with specific and targeted skills to assist the person in achieving their defined goals. One can expect a purposeful and value-directed approach that is measurable and generally effective. Though processing within the therapy session is vital, it will be the client’s work in between that brings to light the changes they hope to attain. I am an active, person-centered, and focused therapist who finds value in working with a broad range of clients, from those seeking small changes in their lives to those who have experienced severe trauma. My training, experience, and therapeutic approach are threaded with values, humor, and levity.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
As a therapist, I tend to engage in training that can exhibit verifiable success across many populations. For example, my primary model in therapy is acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT). ACT is a rigorously-researched, purposeful-based model that has proven beneficial to many people. I have invested heavily in training with the acknowledged experts within this model. As one-size-rarely-fits-all, I am drawn to training with trauma-focused models that, though not as measurable as ACT, serve to complement and leverage ACT to achieve even better clinical results. These models include the trauma resiliency model (TRM), clinical hypnosis, internal family systems, and several others. I am either certified in these models or have extensive training in them. As I continue to grow as a therapist, I will attend annual training because I find it to be an invaluable resource.
How do your core values shape your approach to therapy?
Being self-aware of one's core values provides a direction, a foundation, and context toward how a therapist will connect to their clients. In my experience, knowing one's core values is not sufficient: A therapist should be able to model, convey, and live through those defined values. Carl Rogers’s examples of empathy, congruence, and unconditional positive regard provide a very insightful way to help provide a therapeutic platform from which to grow. When a therapist can exhibit their own core values, the therapeutic environment becomes ideal for clients to begin healing.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
As the field of therapy continues to expand, the opportunities also expand for people who desperately need access to them. Whether it's through an office, a smartphone, or virtual teletherapy, the field is experiencing an exciting time of growth. As it expands, clients can access therapists who fit their mental, geographic, and financial needs where before, many were unable to connect. This reality is also beginning to drive licensing policies across state borders to where, hopefully someday soon, states will allow for reciprocity while still maintaining the high standards of professionalism.
“My training, experience, and therapeutic approach are threaded with values, humor, and levity.”
Interested in speaking with Peter?