Philip Bender, PhD
Philip Bender profile picture

Philip Bender

Psychotherapy, PhD

Dr. Philip Bender is a licensed clinical psychologist. He specializes in working with young adults and creative professionals, frequently treating individuals with depression, anxiety disorders, grief, and unhealthy or unsatisfying relationships. Dr. Bender also offers group therapy for those seeking a more intensive growth experience.
Specialties
General Mental Health
Men's Issues
Relationship Issues
Finances
$ $ $ $ $
$140-200
Sliding Scale
A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
UnitedHealthcare
Oxford Health Plans
Oscar
Out-of-pocket
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Provider
Profile
“Therapy was a natural choice for me because it bridges the gap between the science of mental health and the creativity of responding to an individual, offering all the complexity that is present in a single moment of interaction.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I’ve always been attuned to other people and curious about what makes them tick; I also have a creative drive and an attraction to storytelling. Therapy was a natural choice for me because it bridges the gap between the science of mental health and the creativity of responding to an individual, offering all the complexity that is present in a single moment of interaction. I have trained and worked with people from many different backgrounds and walks of life, including young adults, students, artists, filmmakers, immigrants, and military veterans. I love hearing their stories and helping them shape new narratives for their lives.
What should someone know about working with you?
My style of therapy focuses most on relationships and compassionate acceptance and I find the vast majority of people who seek therapy are having trouble in these areas. How we relate to other people and to ourselves is central to how we experience life on a day-to-day basis. It’s important to look at our reactions to the hardest challenges we face and to the crises and tragedies that we all experience. Many people struggle with the concept of acceptance, confusing it for tolerance or resignation. Acceptance simply means something you can’t change; in this moment, you are where you are. Accepting that truth, rather than struggling against it, frees you up to start working towards something different.
Philip Bender photo 1
What are the benefits of group therapy?
Group therapy has the potential to be more effective and powerful than individual therapy; a group provides a safe space to do hands-on work on your relationships with others and with yourself. We all need people in our lives for connection, validation, support, guidance, intimacy, and so much more. Group offers a social laboratory, a safe space to interact with different types of people, form genuine connections, experiment with new ways of relating, and make mistakes (just like we all do!). Rather than talking about your life challenges from a distance, you can face them in the immediacy of a social setting, with a therapist there to help guide you toward growth and change. I highly recommend it!
How does collaboration with other providers inform your work?
Collaboration is an important part of my work as a therapist. If you are working with multiple providers to address your mental health, we should all be on the same page regarding your goals and needs. As a group therapist, this is particularly important—if you are working with me in a group but see a different therapist for individual treatment, we should be in contact and I always take the initiative to establish that contact. If you work with a psychiatrist for medication, I also hope to be in contact with that person. And, if that’s something you’re considering but haven’t pursued yet, I can help you make a connection.
What advice would you give to someone who is hesitant to try therapy?
I’ve noticed that many people struggle to feel a sense of agency over their mental health treatment; remember, you and your goals are the focus of the therapy! You may be legitimately concerned about whether you can find the right therapist to help you, so consider what type of person you feel most comfortable opening up to. Think about your specific goals: Are you looking for some hands-on learning? A deeper understanding of yourself? A place to just talk? Then ask any prospective therapist specific questions to inform your choice. Most of us offer free phone consultations, including myself!
“My style of therapy focuses most on relationships and compassionate acceptance and I find the vast majority of people who seek therapy are having trouble in these areas.”
Interested in speaking with Philip?