Priti Doshi, LP
Priti Doshi profile picture

Priti Doshi

Psychotherapy, LP

Priti Doshi is a psychotherapist who is committed to helping people understand the conscious and unconscious patterns of behavior that prevent them from finding greater satisfaction in their relationships and lives. She specializes in racial trauma, immigration, and first-generation experiences with a focus on the intersectionality of race, class, gender, and sexuality.
Specialties
General Mental Health
Eating Disorders
Trauma & PTSD
Finances
$ $ $ $ $
$200-260
Sliding Scale
A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
Accepts Out-of-Network
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Provider
Profile
“My approach is collaborative—and I take great care to ensure that I’m listening and acknowledging my client’s process.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist? What inspired you to choose this profession?
My path to becoming a therapist began with my own journey in therapy. My relationship with my therapist allowed me to examine and reflect upon the conscious and unconscious patterns that were preventing me from engaging more deeply in my relationships and living a fuller life. Through the collaborative work with my therapist, I was able to gain a much deeper understanding of how my past was shaping the choices I was making in the present. Psychoanalytic psychotherapy became my area of interest because I believe that examining intergenerational history, early childhood experiences with caregivers, and family stories allows for us to make deeper, lasting internal and external shifts.
What would you want someone to know about working with you?
I am a therapist who focuses on creating a safe and trusting environment, which allows the therapeutic relationship to address difficult and traumatic experiences that may need proper grieving and healing. I help clients understand and cope with their feelings. My approach is collaborative—and I take great care to ensure that I’m listening and acknowledging my client’s process. In addition to psychodynamic psychotherapy, my approach is integrative. I use CBT, DBT, mindfulness, and methods from trauma-based models in my work.
Priti Doshi photo 1
What do you think is the biggest barrier today for people seeking care?
I believe that accessibility and affordability are the biggest barriers for people seeking mental health services. Many people feel lost and overwhelmed when looking for a therapist. There is a lot of misinformation and misconceptions about the therapeutic process. In addition, the insurance landscape prevents people from getting the care they need. Insurance companies financially undervalue therapists and limit or often decline reimbursement requests—many times leading to early termination of the therapeutic relationship. The current healthcare landscape can be frustrating for those who want to give good care and for those who are seeking help. I hope that we will see changes that remove these barriers.
If there was one thing you wish people knew about the therapy experience who might be hesitant to try it, what would that be?
Although therapy may feel uncomfortable and at times confusing, working with the right therapist makes the process worth it. Therapy not only allows for symptom relief, but it can also truly enhance your life, help you untangle unhealthy patterns, and allow you to explore hidden desires. Through examining your conscious and unconscious patterns by way of a safe and open therapeutic alliance, a much more agentic and empowered life can be lived. The more you can understand, articulate, and be comfortable with your range of feelings, the easier it can be to navigate your personal and professional relationships. Your relationship with yourself can also improve significantly.
What excites you most about the evolving mental health landscape?
I’m excited to see and hear professional athletes, comedians, and actors from all races openly talk about their mental health struggles and challenges. Many speak positively about therapy and the healing that took place. I feel that when people speak out about their experiences, it deshames, normalizes, and encourages therapy. It allows for younger and older generations to overcome their fears and embrace the therapeutic process. I believe that if people feel safe and supported enough to enter therapy, there can be a positive rippling effect on our society.
“Through examining your conscious and unconscious patterns by way of a safe and open therapeutic alliance, a much more agentic and empowered life can be lived.”
Interested in speaking with Priti?