Rachel Brannon profile picture

Rachel Brannon Psychotherapy, LCSW

Not Taking New Clients

Rachel Brannon is an experienced clinical social worker who is known for her thoughtful, encouraging approach. She has a particular interest in helping clients connect with their inner selves in a way that shifts perspective and provides a new way forward. Rachel has over 20 years of experience across a variety of settings in New York, Idaho, and Texas.

Specialties
  • General Mental Health
  • Grief and Loss
  • Life Transitions
  • Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
  • Religion and Spirituality
Pay with insurance
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Cigna
  • Aetna
  • UHC Student Resources
  • AllSavers UHC
  • Meritain
  • Nippon
Pay out-of-pocket
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
  • Texas
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Provider
Profile
“Re-ordering your inner and outer worlds can be like rearranging the furniture in your home.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
Years ago, I was a 6th grade English teacher and, after an assignment in which the children wrote their own fairy tales, I became interested in how the stories held patterns of their personality styles, each one a "hero's journey" with particular challenges and accomplishments. For me, this was an "aha" moment. I realized that every person has their own unique journey and unfolding purpose. This led to a lifelong study of psychology, spirituality, and health, which included several years of postgraduate training in Jungian psychology.
What should someone know about working with you?
I find that people benefit from working in two directions at once: Outward and inward. Your outer life includes the strengths and liabilities of your relationships, finances, work, and home life, while your inner life includes your mindset, feelings, dreams, creative impulses, and spiritual life. The flow that comes from the deeper layers of the self — a creative impulse to become oneself — is something that people can learn to recognize and trust. Re-ordering your inner and outer worlds can be like rearranging the furniture in your home. It involves removing what you don’t need, uncovering treasures, and creating space for new things to unfold. What can result from this way of working is a sense of wellbeing, beginning with the life you have.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
My practice is grounded in Jungian depth psychology, and I regularly attend local meetings at a psychoanalytic professional group (but I am eclectic in my approach). I have a deep respect for the recovery programs. I also keep up with new information about mindfulness, existential, trauma-based, and cognitive behavioral techniques. I am a lifelong learner, and always have an audiobook going as well as a stack of books at my bedside (not only psychology books but fiction and poetry, too!).
“It involves removing what you don’t need, uncovering treasures, and creating space for new things to unfold.”