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Rachel Colon Psychotherapy, LCSW

Rachel Colon is a compassionate and thoughtful bilingual clinician who is committed to providing a safe and nonjudgmental therapeutic space. Her goal is to work with you in a collaborative way, using a culturally humble lens and awareness that is not one-size-fits-all. She works with tweens, adolescents, and adults to identify solutions that promote growth and healing.

Specialties
  • General Mental Health
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
  • Parenting
  • Domestic Abuse and Violence
  • Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Harvard Pilgrim
  • Out-of-pocket
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“I approach this work with compassion, empathy, and respect for my clients; I strongly believe therapy is like a delicate dance, where it begins awkward but eventually flows.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I've always found myself in situations where I was advocating for others (family, friends, etc.). Everyone in my family would say, "This kid is going to be an attorney," because there was no battle that crossed my path where I didn’t feel compelled to advocate on someone's behalf. They were wrong about my trajectory and surprised when I decided to become a therapist. What my family didn't realize was that as a therapist, I would also find myself on that continued journey of fiercely advocating for my clients within systems that are similar to tangled webs and supporting them by identifying their strengths so they too feel empowered enough to do the same. I have worked with survivors of trauma (children and families) whose voices have been silenced because of a myriad of issues that come from marginalization and discrimination, and I have created safe enough spaces for healing. This is my life's work and I will continue to show up.
What should someone know about working with you?
I approach this work with compassion, empathy, and respect for my clients; I strongly believe therapy is like a delicate dance, where it begins awkward but eventually flows. I work with pre-teen/tweens, adolescents, and adults who present with trauma histories, depression, anxiety, parenting issues, and women's issues.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
As a clinician, I think it is important to always remember that growth is vital in this field because our clients’ lives and environments are always evolving. I am trauma-trained and am always seeking learning opportunities that are geared toward supporting my clients on their healing journeys. I have a vested interest in learning more about body-based work with survivors of trauma. Collaborating with other providers is very important to me because it's important not to practice in a vacuum.
How do your own core values shape your approach to therapy?
As a woman and bilingual clinician of color, it has been important to me to avail myself to my community in continued advocacy toward breaking the stigma of accessing mental health services. In my work, I use a culturally humble lens to ensure my client feels safe and able to teach me about themselves so that I can conceptualize their case and needs appropriately while identifying the best method of treatment.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
I can't help but point out how COVID served as a reminder of how quickly things can change and the importance of being innovative to accommodate our clients' experiences. I have been particularly impressed by how quickly I was able to shift to a video platform to meet the needs of my clients, learning ways to engage them through a screen. I have appreciated the articles written about innovative ways to support clients through telehealth.
“In my work, I use a culturally humble lens to ensure my client feels safe and able to teach me about themselves so that I can conceptualize their case and needs appropriately while identifying the best method of treatment.”
Interested in speaking with Rachel?