Rachel Goldsmith profile picture

Rachel Goldsmith Psychotherapy, LCSW

Not Taking New Clients

Rachel Goldsmith is a licensed clinical social worker with over 15 years of experience. She works with individuals who are going through life transitions, navigating relationships, and experiencing depression, anxiety, or trauma. She believes that therapy is a relationship between the therapist and the individual where thoughts, feelings, and experiences are explored safely.

Specialties
  • General Mental Health
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Depression
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
  • Domestic Abuse and Violence
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Harvard Pilgrim
  • Out-of-pocket
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New Jersey
  • New York
  • Utah
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Provider
Profile
“Social work practice always strives to view a person within the context of their environment and this is something that really speaks to me.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I was fortunate to fall into the social work profession early in my life and I love being a social worker. Social work practice always strives to view a person within the context of their environment and this is something that really speaks to me. While many people deal with challenging thoughts or emotional states, all of these things are also impacted by our history and current life situations. One doesn't exist without the other. I have worked throughout my career at various nonprofit settings that focused on issues such as domestic violence, immigration, shelter, and housing rights. These experiences allowed me to work with a diverse group of individuals on a wide range of social and emotional challenges. I also received advanced training in trauma treatment. In addition to my work, I teach graduate-level courses in social work. It's so important to me to help the next generation of social workers grow and develop in this profession.
What should someone know about working with you?
Therapy is a very personal experience; I don't have a fixed agenda for our work together. I am not going to judge your life experiences or choices. I want to hear about your life, whatever parts you are ready to share, and what is working well and what isn't. I believe that each person has been coping the best that they can prior to coming to therapy and I wish to build upon your strengths even if you can't easily see them. Therapy is also collaborative and we will work together to identify your goals for therapy and how those goals can evolve and change throughout the work. Perhaps you aren't exactly sure what your goals are — that's ok! We'll explore your thoughts and feelings to see what comes up and go from there. I continually strive to create a therapeutic environment that is inclusive and affirming of each person's intersectional identities, including (but not limited to) race, gender, sexual orientation, and health conditions.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
When I received my social work degree, that was just one milestone in my career and not the end of my training. Since that point, I have never stopped learning and never wish to. I have attended many advanced trainings in various therapeutic interventions while also continuing to learn directly from the individuals I work with. Therapy is not one-size-fits-all and it is my job to constantly evaluate the different ways I work with people and the interventions that I use. If I'm your therapist, I'm going to bring my toolkit filled with many different approaches to our work. If something isn't working or you don't like it, we'll make changes.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
Mental health treatment continues to become more accessible, which is incredibly exciting. I believe that every person should be able to access quality mental health care and, for far too long, that care has been limited. Needing additional support through therapy or psychiatric medication does not mean that there is something wrong with you. It is a sign that your current strategies haven't gotten you the relief that you are looking for. That's where I come in to offer my skills and support.
“I believe that each person has been coping the best that they can prior to coming to therapy and I wish to build upon your strengths even if you can't easily see them.”