Rachel Kaplan profile picture

Rachel Kaplan Psychotherapy, LCSW

Rachel Kaplan specializes in anxiety, chronic illness, depression, self-esteem, life transitions, and navigating relationships. She uses eclectic approaches, including CBT, psychodynamic work, mindfulness, and relaxation strategies to target the mind-body connection. She has an MSW from NYU and postgraduate certifications in advanced CBT and palliative and end-of-life care.

Specialties
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Depression
  • Life Transitions
  • Chronic Illness, Pain and Sleep Disorders
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $200-260
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
  • Aetna
  • Out-of-pocket
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New Jersey
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“The therapist and client must develop strong trust, a good rapport, and a solid connection for change to happen within this intimate and vulnerable setting.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
My family has faced a range of serious health problems, which heightened my interest in learning how families and individuals cope with death, loss, sickness, adjustment, and grief. These family experiences reinforced my natural inclinations and innate ability to want to support people dealing with life challenges. Social work is my first career but I worked in various settings before becoming a psychotherapist, including in an elementary school, an outpatient mental health clinic, and a hospital. Through these experiences, I found that I most enjoy working with adults navigating various life stressors including chronic illness, relationship problems, life transitions, self-esteem issues, anxiety, and depression. I am certified in advanced cognitive behavioral therapy and palliative and end-of-life care and trained in anxiety treatment and CEN. I am currently being trained in working with individuals facing trauma as well as sleep disorders.
What should someone know about working with you?
My intake process is very collaborative and includes a comprehensive assessment that clients complete prior to our first meeting, which is then reviewed in the first several sessions. This assessment process helps me gain a deeper understanding of the client's current levels of distress, how their presenting problems impact their functioning and quality of life, and how they cope. The client also outlines their goals for therapy and what they hope to accomplish or change during the treatment process. I believe that the most important aspect of successful therapy is the relationship. The therapist and client must develop strong trust, a good rapport, and a solid connection for change to happen within this intimate and vulnerable setting. It is vital that the client feels supported, understood, and validated; the therapist must provide a warm, nonjudgmental, and unbiased holding space for the client to feel safe.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
I believe that continuing education is a lifelong process, and this is part of what excites me about this field. There is always more to learn, new skills to develop, and different ways to address and conceptualize presenting problems. I am always reading at least one book about the field of social work or the therapy process, often suggested to me by colleagues or by other therapists in online forums. The books I read cover various areas that are relevant to my clients, particularly the areas of anxiety, depression, chronic illness, childhood emotional neglect, CPTSD, self-esteem, trauma, family dynamics, and attachment. I am enrolled in an intensive trauma course through PESI and am also registered to take a course in CBT for insomnia and sleep disorders. I am interested in gaining further training in various other areas, including motivational interviewing, psychodynamic work, and dialectical behavior therapy.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
I find telehealth to be an incredibly effective medium to deliver therapy and I am excited that this has become a widely accepted method of delivering these services. I have been pleasantly surprised to find that the relationships and connections I have built with my clients through telehealth have been just as successful as in-person therapy. I work with a lot of young adults who have very busy schedules, as well as issues such a chronic illness or anxiety that make it difficult for them to travel to and from a therapist’s office. I believe that without the availability of telehealth, many of the clients I work with would not have sought therapy services. There is also something very intimate and sacred about meeting with someone in their own home setting, where they feel more comfortable and secure and thus often more open to disclosing about themselves and more at ease in general.
“It is vital that the client feels supported, understood, and validated; the therapist must provide a warm, nonjudgmental, and unbiased holding space for the client to feel safe.”
Interested in speaking with Rachel?