Rebecca B. Weston profile picture

Rebecca B. Weston Psychotherapy, LCSW

Not Taking New Clients

Rebecca Weston believes our sense of self, sense of connection, and sense of capacity are influenced by both internal and structural/systemic aspects of our lives. She draws from her clinical, activist, and legal backgrounds to create a space where clients can find the self-understanding, self-compassion, and self-confidence to address the challenges in their daily lives.

Specialties
  • General Mental Health
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
  • Marriage and Partnerships
  • Women’s Mental Health (Pregnancy, Infertility and Post-Partum)
  • Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Cigna
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Out-of-pocket
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“With warmth and curiosity, I take seriously our connections to important people in our past and in our present.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I was previously a public interest lawyer and after feeling very frustrated with the legal system, I chose to focus on what I love: Connecting with people in a way that feels authentic, hopeful, and sustaining. I bring both an expansive and informed understanding about the ways our larger world impacts our daily life (looking at racism, sexism, economic anxiety, or climate concerns) and deep appreciation for individual histories and family dynamics. With warmth and curiosity, I take seriously our connections to important people in our past and in our present. I am nonjudgmental and I often find courage, meaning, and hope where others see destructiveness, attention-seeking, or inexplicable rage. I have worked in private practice, in mental health clinics, and in a hospital setting where I developed a trauma-informed and restorative justice model for assessing and treating sexual assault and abuse. I trained extensively in attachment, in relational trauma, and in body-based treatment modalities.
What should someone know about working with you?
My intake process is very much like my work: Open, exploratory, and focused on whether or not there is a felt connection. Progress, to me, is when the client feels as though they are approaching their life with greater ease, confidence, and flexibility.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
I focus my training most heavily on attachment dynamics, emotion-focused couples therapy (EFT), and various trauma treatment modalities.
How do your core values shape your approach to therapy?
At heart, I deeply respect and am curious about the many ways in which people find solutions to the problems of growing up and loving other people in our complex and challenging world. Within my own family, there is a strong history of historical and racial trauma related to world events and as a consequence, I bring to my own practice a very strong commitment to egalitarian, nonjudgmental, and honest exploration.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
I am very involved in the emerging field of climate psychology and eco-anxiety. I believe that issues of climate justice and sustainability are only getting more pressing and I believe that talking about these issues from a mental health perspective will help us find successful modes of action to build a sustainable world.
“I am nonjudgmental and I often find courage, meaning, and hope where others see destructiveness, attention-seeking, or inexplicable rage.”