Renee Royceston-Meza profile picture

Renee Royceston-Meza Psychotherapy, LCSW

Renee Royceston provides therapy to individuals and partners. She has extensive practice working with LGBTQ+, trans and nonbinary people, and survivors of trauma. Renee is trained in bereavement counseling, end-of-life issues, and caregiver support. She treats depression, anxiety, ADHD, infertility issues, and more. Sessions are nonjudgmental, collaborative, and nurturing.

Specialties
  • Grief and Loss
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
  • LGBTQIA+
  • Race and Ethnicity
  • Women’s Mental Health
Pay with insurance
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Cigna
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
Pay out-of-pocket
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New Jersey
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“My own experience as a black, queer, immigrant, cis-gender woman allows me to further understand and connect to the intersectionality of my clients.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I was drawn to the field of psychotherapy due to my natural ability to empathize and validate the struggles of others. I became interested in the field of social work due to the way it treats the whole person. As a therapist, I enjoy guiding people through life’s transitions, deciphering personal challenges, exploring emotional trials, and empowering people to achieve a healthier mind. I have worked in the field of social advocacy, academic advisement, intensive case management, and counseling in community and clinical settings. I have ample experience working with those in the LGBTQIA+ community and have led community-wide initiatives to promote change and understanding. While working as a college counselor, I co-facilitated and organized the Safe Space Alliance to promote support and safety for LGBTQIA+ students on campus. My own experience as a black, queer, immigrant, cis-gender woman allows me to further understand and connect to the intersectionality of my clients.
What should someone know about working with you?
Making the decision to seek therapy is a self-empowering and courageous task. We live in a society that often teaches us not to trust others or to mask our feelings for our own safety. Therefore, I hold the therapeutic experience as a sacred space and I am honored to form therapeutic relationships with my clients. I conduct individual and couple/relational sessions and help people heal from socio-cultural formations (racism, sexism, ableism, cis-sexism, patriarchy, classism, etc.), while always staying LGBTQIA+, poly, spiritually, and culturally-affirming. I invite my clients to an introductory session where we can get to know one another and they can learn about my therapeutic style. During that session, I will ask basic information and find out what the client hopes to gain from our time together. My therapeutic style is eclectic, holistic, and non-directive, encompassing mindfulness, strengths-based, and other therapeutic interventions.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
As a clinician and overall scholar, I continuously expand my knowledge via professional training, workshops, and clinical readings. I completed a course on bereavement counseling where I learned various techniques. I also have a large and varied network of clinicians for peer supervision and guidance. However, I consider my clients to be my biggest teachers and garner so much knowledge about human beings from working with human beings. Therefore, I make it my goal to learn about each one of my clients and address their individual needs in our therapeutic sessions.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
We live in a time of great change and change is often scary. However, the change that has taken place in the world of therapy is the expansion of cultural competence. The ability and importance of mental health practitioners to take accountability for understanding how issues of race, class, gender, sexuality, and intergenerational trauma inform their practice with their clients is more paramount than ever before. Furthermore, the glass ceiling is shattering, allowing for the contributions of clinicians of color to be taken seriously in the world of clinical therapy.
“I conduct individual and couple/relational sessions and help people heal from socio-cultural formations (racism, sexism, ableism, cis-sexism, patriarchy, classism, etc.), while always staying LGBTQIA+, poly, spiritually, and culturally-affirming.”
Interested in speaking with Renee?