Sabrina Sarro, LMSW
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Sabrina Sarro

Psychotherapy, LMSW

Sabrina Sarro is a queer, nonbinary psychotherapist of color who centers unheard voices through intersectional, decolonized, and trauma-informed counseling. They are committed to co-creating a space where your narrative and whole self feel affirmed and validated. They are a shadow-worker and employ different modalities like The Sacred Enneagram, Human Design, and Nen-Archetypes.
Specialties
Coaching
LGBTQ
Relationship Issues
Locations
Finances
$ $ $ $ $
$140-200
Sliding Scale
A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
Out-of-pocket
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Provider
Profile
“I believe in intersectional and integrated work: I will not and cannot talk about one of your identities without contextualizing how that part of you informs the larger picture of who you are.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
As a narrative-driven individual, and someone who has always derived great joy from both listening and sharing stories, becoming a therapist seemed like the only natural course for me. Since childhood, I have always gravitated toward developing and discovering what is so fulfilling about interpersonal connection—and why I love to not only engage in intentional introspection myself, but also help facilitate that potential platform for others. I know firsthand how isolating and frightening it can be to not feel safe in your mind or body, or to feel as though your personhood, experiences, and thoughts are not working in alignment with you in some way. I know what it’s like to navigate life in the margins.
What should someone know about working with you?
I am a highly sensitive person, and identify as an intuitive worker. I identify as a shadow worker and believe deeply in anti-mask and psychic intuition work ,as well as in my empathic powers. I am unique in how I synthesize what might be showing up for you—I am highly creative and enjoy employing modalities that fall outside the binary, including honoring ancestral, eastern, and spiritual pathways to healing and discovery. I believe in intersectional and integrated work: I will not and cannot talk about one of your identities without contextualizing how that part of you informs the larger picture of who you are. I believe you are the expert of your own narrative—and that through co-creating the therapeutic space and collaboratively defining what safety and care might look like for you, healing is possible.
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How does collaboration with other providers inform your work?
I believe that collaboration with other practitioners and mental health professionals is an integral part of the work. It's what supports us in brainstorming and envisioning new pathways to healing. The intersection of different interdisciplinary fields can be a huge component in community building, intentional allyship, and social advocacy. I love connecting with folx from different backgrounds who are committed to building intentional healing pathways for clients—and who are also willing to lean into the discomfort and challenge some of their own indoctrinated methodologies and training in pursuit of what’s best for the client.
What advice would you give to someone who is hesitant to try therapy?
Do not be afraid to challenge or dismantle toxic narratives about therapy—or what therapy can look like. I know this is easier said than done, and that stigma is so real. I know that sometimes our cultures do not support the idea of therapy, and that there are very real emotional and financial barriers to accessing comprehensive and intentional care. I encourage everyone to try to be open to the process—and to be intentional when choosing a therapist. Ask a therapist how they approach things like holding space for people of color and black trans femmes and practicing intersectionality. You have every right to access the care you want and to receive care that is informed, competent, and that reflects and centers your identities.
How would you suggest that potential clients confront feelings of shame around therapy?
Whether it was because we live in a racist, cis-hetero, sexist world that treats Black and Brown people as invisible or because that world denies basic human rights to LGBTQIA*+, Indigenous, and femme-identified folx, I grew up feeling ashamed of my early start to therapy and of my identities. But that shame is part of the violent, flawed rhetoric that cons us into thinking that accessing or seeking care is inherently wrong or unhealthy. I encourage and implore you to be radically intentional about getting the care you deserve—and to interrogate the sources of what has taught you to internalize negative beliefs about therapy and what therapy can be.
“You have every right to access the care you want and to receive care that is informed, competent, and that reflects and centers your identities.”
Interested in speaking with Sabrina?