Sabrina Scharff, LCSW
Sabrina Scharff profile picture

Sabrina Scharff

Psychotherapy, LCSW

Sabrina Scharff is a clinical social worker and psychotherapist who works with individuals navigating relationship issues, life and career transitions, and personal growth. In addition to her private practice, Sabrina also works with oncology patients at New York Presbyterian Hospital and teaches yoga.
Specialties
General Mental Health
Personal Growth
Relationship Issues
Finances
$ $ $ $ $
$140-200
Sliding Scale
A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
UnitedHealthcare
Oxford Health Plans
Oscar
Out-of-pocket
portrait photograph of provider
Provider
Profile
“I believe that you are the expert on yourself, and it is my role to be your ally as you access your best and most-fulfilled self and move through the ever-changing world around you.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I like to think that this profession found me just as much as I found this profession. A natural inclination to support people who are experiencing discomfort has been a common thread throughout my personal and professional life. Growing up, I witnessed people struggle with seeking mental health support and feeling acceptance from, and ease with, providers. After working in a different field for several years, I was called back to my innate desire to work with people in a truly meaningful way. I completed my master’s degree in social work with a focus on clinical work with individuals and families, and later went on to complete a post-master's program in psychodynamic psychotherapy.
What should someone know about working with you?
Human beings are multifaceted, so my approach is integrative—I draw from various orientations in order to match treatment to the uniqueness of you. I believe that you are the expert on yourself, and it is my role to be your ally as you access your best and most-fulfilled self and move through the ever-changing world around you. My style is compassionate, supportive, and curious. I listen actively, inquire authentically, and challenge empathetically to help you develop insight into and move through your stressors. It is my belief that weekly, in-person therapy sessions provide the best landscape for this meaningful work.
Sabrina Scharff photo 1
What advice would you give to someone who is hesitant to try therapy?
Hesitation is completely understandable. It takes courage to open up and share what we generally keep to ourselves. It’s okay to build trust at your own pace, and I aim to create a space where you can feel safe even in your most vulnerable moments. My advice to someone who is uncertain about trying therapy is that, living in New York City, you know what it’s like to navigate through tough, awkward, uncertain scenarios—and you usually do it for the benefit of someone or something else. You deserve the rewards of your hard work, too. Therapy preserves space in your life to honor and explore your feelings and thoughts without worrying about the judgment that often intrudes on so many of our experiences.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
In recent years, there has been a significant shift in the way people talk about mental health care, which therefore shifts the way people think about mental health care. While there remains a lot of work to be done on accessibility, cultural competency, and destigmatization, it is exciting to see a rejection of the “one-size-fits-all” model as well as an embrace of non-traditional therapies. It is encouraging to have well-known, diverse individuals in our society openly discuss their mental health, proven research on the effectiveness of mindfulness practices on anxiety and cortisol, and new technology that helps us meet our mental health goals.
What are the biggest misconceptions about therapy?
I hear a lot of people say their struggles aren’t serious enough to warrant therapy and they “should” be able to figure it out on their own. The biggest misconception about therapy is that it’s only for those who are unable to cope, dealing with “serious trauma,” or who have something “wrong” with them. Therapy helps people from all walks of life for a myriad of reasons. Another misconception is that a therapist will quickly solve problems for someone. Therapy is a process, and progress relies on collaboration. It requires time, commitment, and energy. Additionally, and importantly, there is no rule that says your therapist is always right and you cannot verbalize a disagreement. This, too, can be an illuminating part of the work!
“Therapy preserves space in your life to honor and explore your feelings and thoughts without worrying about the judgment that often intrudes on so many of our experiences.”
Interested in speaking with Sabrina?