Shelby Jackowitz Muller profile picture

Shelby Jackowitz Muller Psychotherapy, LCSW

Not Taking New Clients

Shelby Muller is a licensed clinical social worker with experience working with issues of anxiety, depression, substance abuse, and making change in life during challenging transitional periods. With a collaborative approach, she empowers and guides clients to deepen their understanding of themselves and further use this insight to initiate change and identify goals within reach.

Specialties
  • General Mental Health
  • Depression
  • Life Transitions
  • Addiction and Substance Misuse
  • Bipolar Disorder
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Harvard Pilgrim
  • Out-of-pocket
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“Once my clients can identify what they want to gain from therapy, the challenges that are holding them back, and what things they want most out of life, I strive to empower and guide them in learning how to get where they want to be.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I knew from an early age that I wanted to help people but it wasn’t until my own experience with therapy that I began to understand my purpose. I began to recognize the challenge of change and how our ability to navigate that change directly correlates to our happiness and general wellbeing. I believe that our relationship with ourselves can be the most important one. Being able to provide a safe space for you to explore yourself in an authentic manner seems like the most beneficial way to spend my time.
What should someone know about working with you?
I have worked in a variety of settings within mental health and have come to appreciate the significance of forming an individualized treatment plan; therapy is not a one-size-fits-all approach. It is a very collaborative process and I meet the client where they are. Once my clients can identify what they want to gain from therapy, the challenges that are holding them back, and what things they want most out of life, I strive to empower and guide them in learning how to get where they want to be. I am here for you and only you; I try to encourage clients to be in the here and now and slow down so that they can truly understand who they are and who they want to be.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
I largely believe that my work with clients provides constant opportunity for me to learn as a clinician. In addition to learning from the therapist and client relationship, I am always looking to participate in continuing education, seminars, and training on a range of topics; I am an active learner and largely connect with the idea that knowledge is power. I have participated in training on trauma, pain management, and psychodynamic approaches to panic, anxiety, and depression. I worked as both a psychotherapist and psychiatric social worker on an interdisciplinary team and teamwork and collaboration are core values that I view as essential to implementing therapy through a strengths-based perspective.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
I am excited about the growing accessibility to mental health treatment and the awareness that has been brought to the field. Telemedicine has broken down the barriers that kept people from seeking the help and living their most desired life. I enjoy utilizing phone and video sessions as ways of making therapy more accessible. The reduced stigma associated with therapy and treatment provides a chance for individuals to learn more about themselves with less shame and a greater sense of hope. It's exciting that more people are starting to understand that therapy can begin from a good place; we do not have to be struggling or feeling like the walls are closing in on us in order to start the process of healing.
What advice would you give to someone who is new or hesitant to start therapy?
I acknowledge the courage it takes to seek a more fulfilling and happier life and commend you for your choice to reach that goal. It is completely normal to be nervous about new things, especially things that are not often talked about among family and friends. Taking the step to focus on yourself in all ways (and not just negative ones) is often the hardest and most important step in fostering change. Therapy is not only about what doesn’t work and what we can fix but also an opportunity to explore things we love and learn how to embrace them further. While working together at your own pace, I believe therapy can highlight the power of authenticity and I strive to provide a direct, humanistic, and solution-focused approach.
“I am here for you and only you; I try to encourage clients to be in the here and now and slow down so that they can truly understand who they are and who they want to be.”