Shelby Miller profile picture

Shelby Miller Psychotherapy, LMFT

Not Taking New Clients

Shelby Miller specializes in healing relationships with the ones who matter most (including ourselves). Through emotionally-focused therapy (a science-based, mind-body approach), clients connect to themselves and others, allowing for the freedom to thrive. Therapy is practical, focused, and experiential, all ingredients important to achieving the revisions clients are seeking.

Specialties
  • Depression
  • Life Transitions
  • Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
  • Marriage and Partnerships
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Out-of-pocket
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • Arizona
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Provider
Profile
“I have been told that I am approachable, practical, and human, all of which makes clients feel like they can relax and do meaningful work.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I was drawn to the field of psychotherapy in my teenage years with a deep understanding that we all have the potential to heal if it is together. Like so many of us, I did not always have the support and acceptance I longed for in times of suffering. I couldn't come up with any other career path other than coming alongside folks (including myself!) to help feel and understand feelings, thoughts, and behaviors. I have been told that I am approachable, practical, and human, all of which makes clients feel like they can relax and do meaningful work. I have worked in substance abuse, college counseling centers, general counseling centers, and private practice. I am a certified emotionally-focused couples and individual therapist, which is a model that I deeply love for its ability to normalize our human longings and protections around our attachments. EFT is an immense gift to my practice, as it turns out that most of our suffering is related to our relationships with self and others.
What should someone know about working with you?
After scheduling an appointment with me, clients fill out intake paperwork online. During the first 1-2 sessions, we get to know each other, identify areas where you are stuck, and make goals together about where and how change can happen. I see progress in the following ways: Building awareness of triggering events, feelings, thoughts and behaviors; implementing newfound resourcing techniques we learn and practice in therapy; and integrating and adapting to change in daily life. I am not a homework-heavy therapist (this usually gets folks into their heads and disconnected from their experiences), but I will invite clients to practice various awareness-building and resourcing techniques in between sessions. The clients I enjoy most are those who are willing to let me earn their trust as well as those willing to take difficult risks to heal.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
Relational trauma and emotional regulation are areas that I am particularly interested in as a provider. I consistently attend training and engage in my own practice to help others come close to the hurt, pain, and fear that often lead to confusing and dreadful symptoms. I consider it a lifelong practice to cultivate acceptance and kindness toward our pain; this, I feel, is the key to healing. Collaborating with other providers around trauma can often involve self-of-the-therapist work. Such experiential practice regarding my own blocks helps me to show up for my clients on a deeper, more human level.
How do your core values shape your approach to therapy?
My core values are quite simple: Show up for yourself and show up for others. In my therapy practice, this translates across the board, from being punctual and organized to being direct and kind with folks. This also applies to being a culturally-sensitive clinician. As a white, cisgender, heterosexual, able-bodied female, I consider it a lifelong practice to continuously learn about my privilege in the world and my profession. In addition to personally understanding the ongoing impact of racism, homophobia, and transphobia, I attend training through my professional organization around culturally-inclusive therapy.
“EFT is an immense gift to my practice, as it turns out that most of our suffering is related to our relationships with self and others.”