Shlomit Liz Sanders profile picture

Shlomit Liz Sanders Psychotherapy, LMFT

Shlomit (Liz) Sanders is a certified clinical trauma professional (CCTP) who's goal-oriented in the hopes of providing insight into life's challenges while encouraging empowerment toward resolution. She works with individuals, couples, and families in a variety of areas, including trauma, anxiety, depression, self-esteem, self-empowerment, and interpersonal relationships.

Shlomit (Liz) Sanders is a certified clinical trauma professional (CCTP) who's goal-oriented in the hopes of providing insight into life's challenges while encouraging empowerment toward resolution. She works with individuals, couples, and families …

Shlomit (Liz) Sanders is a certified clinical trauma professional (CCTP) who's goal-oriented in the hopes of providing insight into life's challenges while encouraging empowerment toward resolution. She works with individuals, couples, and families in a variety of areas, including trauma, anxiety, depression, self-esteem, self-empowerment, and interpersonal relationships.

Specialties
  • Grief and Loss
  • Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
  • Parenting
  • Women’s Mental Health
  • Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Pay with insurance
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
Pay with a program
  • Optum Live & Work Well (EAP)
Pay out-of-pocket
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • Sliding scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
Locations
  • Offers virtual sessions
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New Jersey
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“I'm a very direct, goal-oriented therapist, which helps structure the sessions and provides the foundation of what we will be working on and toward.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I feel that I was put on this earth to help people. I originally became a therapist after my parents got divorced in my late teens. As time passed, I began noticing more divorces in my inner circle and it intrigued me enough to find out why some people are able to have more successful or healthier relationships than others. I became certified in trauma after working with the severely mentally ill population and seeing a lot of trauma and the impact it had on their lives. This led me down the path of neuroscience, which clearly shows we all have the inner ability to heal ourselves. I incorporate studies of neuroscience into my work with trauma and psychotherapy in general.
What should someone know about working with you?
Sometimes, I liken the intake to the dating process: You get an opportunity to see if you feel comfortable with me and wish to proceed with the therapeutic relationship. I'm a very direct, goal-oriented therapist, which helps structure the sessions and provides the foundation of what we will be working on and toward. This also helps identify if progress is being made. I often assign homework in order to bridge the gap between the things being discussed in session and your real life. You can expect a safe, nonjudgmental space to explore any concerns you may have.
What's couples therapy and what can I expect to happen there?
Couples therapy is for couples looking to strengthen their bond with one another, regardless of the stage they're in (this includes pre-marital counseling). You'll get to learn more about yourself, your expectations, and your needs as well as how to communicate effectively with your partner. You will learn communication skills, explore conflict resolution, and focus on the goals and concerns you bring into session. There's a misconception that couples therapy is the "last stop" before divorce or separation, but there's no need to fear seeking help. The sooner you reach out for help, the sooner you can learn how to have a healthy and satisfying relationship.
“You can expect a safe, nonjudgmental space to explore any concerns you may have.”