Silvia Fiammenghi profile picture

Silvia Fiammenghi Psychotherapy, PsyD

Not Taking New Clients

Silvia Fiammenghi is a psychologist licensed in Italy and New York. She offers treatment in English, Italian, and Spanish. Her expertise includes trauma work, college mental health, and intercultural issues. She uses an integrative approach that is relational in nature and includes her knowledge of yoga to assist clients as they develop an awareness of the body-mind balance.

Specialties
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
  • Eating Disorders and Body Image
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
  • Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Pay with insurance
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
Pay out-of-pocket
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“I do not expect clients to come to sessions prepared in any specific way and I let each session unfold freely.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
After completing my studies and becoming licensed as a psychologist in Italy, I pursued a PsyD at Long Island University in New York. I completed my doctoral internship in a long-term psychiatric facility in the Bronx and then joined NYU and made my way back to Italy as the NYU Florence campus psychologist. In 2015, I started a small private practice and in 2019, while I continued working for NYU and enjoying college mental health work, I started working primarily in private practice. Along the way, I did some community service as a consultant for nonprofits, working with recent migrants. Working in different settings and in diverse communities has shaped me into a versatile clinician, one who can relate to a wide breadth of clients. Currently, my youngest client is 18 and my oldest is 77. I have worked with individuals from several continents and with the most diverse backgrounds, so cultural sensitivity is at the forefront of my clinical approach.
What should someone know about working with you?
I view therapy as a two-person process that evolves over time. I consider it to be a journey in which I am an active participant, side by side, with my client. I rarely assign homework and, even then, I see it more as a suggestion rather than an actual assignment. I do not expect clients to come to sessions prepared in any specific way and I let each session unfold freely. With each client, a unique path and pace develop. Periodically, I take the time in session to look at progress together with my client and walk down memory lane, comparing where we started with where we are on the journey. We talk about the obstacles behind us and about those that are still lying ahead.
How do your core values shape your approach to therapy?
I grew up in a relatively small, one-dimensional, not-at-all diverse college town in the northern area of Italy. Studying abroad, living in New York City, and traveling as much of the world as I possibly could have changed me profoundly and I bring the small town girl, the New Yorker, and the world traveler to my sessions. The thread that ties my experience together is made of my respect for each individual’s story and my firm belief that we are all worthy, all equal, and all very different. I care about my clients and about their stories. Cultural sensitivity is a defining aspect of my work, which I use to understand each client’s world and make therapy a truly safe space.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
I practice almost entirely via telehealth and I view remote work as an opportunity to make therapy much more flexible and accessible to people no matter where they are or the specifics of their daily circumstances. I recognize the obvious benefits of in-person sessions and believe that teletherapy is not for everyone. Each case must, of course, be clinically evaluated, but overall, I think that the pros of remote therapy vastly outweigh the cons. I am excited to see what this new opportunity will bring in the future.
“Studying abroad, living in New York City, and traveling as much of the world as I possibly could have changed me profoundly and I bring the small town girl, the New Yorker, and the world traveler to my sessions.”