Sonja Welch profile picture

Sonja Welch Psychotherapy, LPC

Not Taking New Clients

Sonja Welch is a licensed professional counselor (LPC) who believes clients are the experts of their own lives. Sonja offers a nonjudgmental, compassionate, and safe environment to help clients navigate through whatever difficulties they face. One goal during sessions is to encourage the incorporation of self-care practices in the client’s daily life.

Sonja Welch is a licensed professional counselor (LPC) who believes clients are the experts of their own lives. Sonja offers a nonjudgmental, compassionate, and safe environment to help clients navigate through whatever difficulties they face. One g…

Sonja Welch is a licensed professional counselor (LPC) who believes clients are the experts of their own lives. Sonja offers a nonjudgmental, compassionate, and safe environment to help clients navigate through whatever difficulties they face. One goal during sessions is to encourage the incorporation of self-care practices in the client’s daily life.

Specialties
  • General Mental Health
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Life Transitions
  • Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
Pay with insurance
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Cigna
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield
Pay with a program
  • Optum Live & Work Well (EAP)
Pay out-of-pocket
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $80-140
  • Sliding scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New Jersey
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Provider
Profile
“I am often known to say, “You are the expert of you. You have the answers you desire; let’s work together to find the questions to obtain those solutions.””
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
My path to counseling started with a psychology class in high school. I still remember the course content that would ultimately send me on this journey. Life happens, as do detours; I got married, started a family, and became a teacher. As friends and colleagues approached me with their life’s problems, I felt inadequate even though I had the desire to help them. I witnessed many friends and acquaintances hurting emotionally and mentally and wanted to be able to make a difference. I received my clinical training in a nonprofit agency that caters to individuals with substance use disorders and mental health disorders. Since then, I have worked with clients diagnosed with substance use, anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, marriage problems, couples issues, and change of life challenges.
What should someone know about working with you?
I strive to create an empathic, warm, and nonjudgmental atmosphere with my clients, ensuring they feel safe, heard, and understood. My clients and I walk together on their journey to achieving their goals. They know themselves better than I know them. I am often known to say, “You are the expert of you. You have the answers you desire; let’s work together to find the questions to obtain those solutions.” I feel it is important for my clients to partake in their journey toward self-awareness and good mental health and to feel empowered while doing so. To help in this process, I may suggest books and music in the form of homework.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
I believe that in this journey of life, we are constantly evolving. We grow and change or we stagnate. In this growth process, there is always more to learn. In order to provide quality care to my clients, I read literature relevant to their diagnoses, attend training, go to seminars on topics, and complete continuing education courses.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
I am most excited about the progress in acceptance of mental health treatment in communities of color. There is acknowledgement that discussions are needed regarding therapy and an understanding that it can change lives.
“I believe that in this journey of life, we are constantly evolving.”