Stan Gajda profile picture

Stan Gajda Psychotherapy, LMHC

Stan Gajda has an approach that is both client-centered and evidence-based. He lets the client guide where they want to go and what they want to achieve through treatment. He is integrative in his approach but has training in CPT, EMDR, ACT, and mindfulness, which he uses to help each individual reach their goals.

Specialties
  • General Mental Health
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Depression
  • Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
  • Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Pay with insurance
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Cigna
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
Pay out-of-pocket
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $80-140
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • Massachusetts
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Provider
Profile
“Everyone has strengths that can be tapped into and people can use their personal wisdom with guidance to better manage their concerns.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I have been a therapist for over 20 years and have worked in a variety of settings with a diverse population of clients. In life, everyone experiences adversity, which sometimes is difficult to manage alone. Everyone has strengths that can be tapped into and people can use their personal wisdom with guidance to better manage their concerns.
What should someone know about working with you?
My practice is focused on working with adults. My initial intake allows me to gain a better understanding of an individual's background, concerns, and goals to determine the best counseling approach that fits their needs. Sessions can be open and free-flowing or structured, based upon the agreed-upon goals. I provide CBT, CPT, and other skill-based approaches that may involve work between sessions or work from an ACT, EMDR, or mindfulness approach based upon the values one is intent on living. Progress from my perspective is wholly determined by the individual.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
As a counselor, I'm always learning and working on my own ability to improve my skills whether this comes from formal training, professional readings, or lived experience. The integration of clinical and personal is where I believe effectiveness is realized as a counselor.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
Telehealth has expanded rapidly and the ability to help more individuals through this approach has been exciting for me as a clinician. Oftentimes, the actual system of scheduling and attending a counseling session can be time-consuming and hard to manage in person. Providing telehealth through a less invasive method has truly been a much-needed change for those who desire access to counseling but haven't been able to get treatment because of life's demands.
Have you done any research-based work that you found particularly exciting? How does it inform your practice today?
I've done research on an abbreviated model for CBT-I (cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia) in my continuing studies. Sleep is often overlooked in most treatment approaches but it affects so much of life. The skills I learned from my research have definitely impacted my practice and added to my overall approach to counseling.
“I provide CBT, CPT, and other skill-based approaches that may involve work between sessions or work from an ACT, EMDR, or mindfulness approach based upon the values one is intent on living.”
Interested in speaking with Stan?