Steven Sussman, PhD
Steven Sussman profile picture

Steven Sussman

Psychotherapy, PhD

Steven Sussman treats children and teens with attention deficit disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, Asperger's and autistic spectrum disorders, bipolar disorder, and school underachievement. He has developed child-friendly techniques that are effective, even with children who are resistant to therapy. He consults with schools to assure a child's best interests are served.
Specialties
Attention and Hyperactivity
Pediatrics
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Finances
$ $ $ $ $
$80-140
Sliding Scale
A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
UnitedHealthcare
Oxford Health Plans
Aetna
Oscar
Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield
Out-of-pocket
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Provider
Profile
“Working with children and teens has become a passion that excites me; reaching, teaching, educating, and motivating kids who are struggling fulfills me and gives me purpose in life.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
A child of the 60s, I was drawn to the Civil Rights and anti-war movements; I wanted to understand and ameliorate the suffering of others. Psychology seemed like the perfect way to help those in pain and empower them to overcome their worries. I have learned to be perceptive and empathic, which enables me to quickly assess problems and help clients remedy those problems. Working with children and teens has become a passion that excites me; reaching, teaching, educating, and motivating kids who are struggling fulfills me and gives me purpose in life.
What should someone know about working with you?
When a parent allows me to work with their child and family, I consider it a sacred trust. I conduct therapy online and I am always available by phone between sessions, including weekends and holidays. Parents are present at all sessions to supply feedback and to learn more effective parenting techniques.
How do your own core values shape your approach to therapy?
I believe our society has an epidemic of kids who feel entitled. Such youngsters do not abide by rules, do not adequately respect their parents, and do not appreciate the sacrifices their parents make to provide the wonderful things they have been given. We as a society have been guilty of teaching our children that authority figures are in place to please us and give us what we want, even if it isn’t earned or deserved.
“When a parent allows me to work with their child and family, I consider it a sacred trust.”
Interested in speaking with Steven?