Tahmina Parveen profile picture

Tahmina Parveen Medication Management, PMHNP-BC

Not Taking New Clients

Tahmina Parveen has over 10 years of experience providing high-quality, client-centered care. She has experience in treating a wide range of psychiatric conditions, but her specialties include ADHD, anxiety, depression, OCD, PTSD, and sleep disorders.

Specialties
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Depression
  • ADD/ADHD
  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
  • Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Harvard Pilgrim
  • Out-of-pocket
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“Those who know me personally and professionally say I am empathetic, honest, a great listener, a hard worker, and I go above and beyond to help others.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
My career is one that I didn't choose myself; it chose me. Growing up, I knew I wanted to do something in healthcare. When I took my first psychology class, I knew from that day that this was my calling. Psychology is the study of mind and people and throughout my life, I have always been observational, bridging that connection and finding meaning. Those who know me personally and professionally say I am empathetic, honest, a great listener, a hard worker, and I go above and beyond to help others. Working in psychiatry gives me the greatest chance to give back to others by meeting new people, listening to them, supporting them, and treating them. My passion for the field allows me to help others find their own path to mental wellness.
What should someone know about working with you?
Working with me means that we are working together. Psychiatry is a working relationship and in order for me to treat my clients, we need to have a good therapeutic relationship. Working with me means you will have an active role in decisions, be educated on any questions, and be comfortable in every step. On intake, you can expect questions about current symptoms and past medical, social, and family history, all of which help formulate parts of an individualized treatment plan. Although I am mostly focused on medication management, I do incorporate holistic, lifestyle, and psychotherapy options into the plan as well. I have worked with a wide array of mental illnesses but my specialties are ADHD, depression, anxiety, OCD, PTSD, and sleep disorders.
How do your core values shape your approach to therapy?
Growing up in a South Asian family, I know all too well the stigma related to mental health and the lack of accessibility. I am aware firsthand of the many cultural reasons to avoid seeking mental help. I would like to break barriers, educate, bring awareness, and give people a voice. I want those who went through similar cultural stigmas of mental health to know I will help you find your own voice and mental wellness of your choice. I often meet adults who seek mental health on their own because as a child they could not, and it brings me joy to help them clarify questions they had to dismiss. By working together and bringing awareness, I help the client and break barriers so that the same person can change the cultural stigma for those around them. It is impactful interactions like these that will allow psychiatry to become more normalized in our society.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
Charting notes on paper when I started as a nurse and now seeing clients from the comfort of my own home really astonishes me. The evolution of telehealth has truly been amazing. We live in a fast-paced world and allowing clients accessibility to appointments from their phone allows them to be more proactive and compliant with their treatment plans and goals.
What else would you want someone to know about working with you?
In life, we always have to try. We have to try to understand, try to get better, and try to find ourselves. At appointments, you’re trying and that’s already a great start. Remember that in life as long as you TRY, failure cannot exist. Let’s celebrate “the try” and look forward to your future success.
“Working in psychiatry gives me the greatest chance to give back to others by meeting new people, listening to them, supporting them, and treating them.”