Thomas Johnson profile picture

Thomas Johnson Psychotherapy, LCSW

Thomas Johnson has an eclectic approach to working with clients. He provides an active and interactive level of engagement, which is goal-oriented and problem-focused. He treats adults 21+, including the LGBT+ community for individual or couples therapy. He treats depression, anxiety, and various types of trauma, including early childhood experiences and relational conflict.

Thomas Johnson has an eclectic approach to working with clients. He provides an active and interactive level of engagement, which is goal-oriented and problem-focused. He treats adults 21+, including the LGBT+ community for individual or couples the…

Thomas Johnson has an eclectic approach to working with clients. He provides an active and interactive level of engagement, which is goal-oriented and problem-focused. He treats adults 21+, including the LGBT+ community for individual or couples therapy. He treats depression, anxiety, and various types of trauma, including early childhood experiences and relational conflict.

Specialties
  • General Mental Health
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Depression
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
  • LGBTQIA+
Pay with insurance
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Cigna
  • Aetna
  • Medicare
  • Empire Blue Cross Blue Shield

    including BlueCard Network access

    Have coverage through another Blue Cross Blue Shield plan? You may be eligible to see this provider if you have BlueCard Network access. Check if this applies to your plan
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
Pay with a program
  • Optum Live & Work Well (EAP)
Pay out-of-pocket
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $80-140
  • Sliding scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“When I first meet with new clients, I share my approach to therapy by encouraging them to discuss issues they may not want to.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I began my career working with teens who had been placed in residential treatment by the New York Family Courts. This afforded me the chance to work with families of these teens as they returned to the community and needed support adjusting back to school and family life. Eventually, I engaged in analytical training, which led to working with combat veterans and a wide array of clinical issues that they confronted after returning to civilian life. My private practice grew out of this career with the Department of Veterans Affairs.
What should someone know about working with you?
When I first meet with new clients, I share my approach to therapy by encouraging them to discuss issues they may not want to. This usually gets them to discuss what they really need to discuss as they feel comfortable doing so.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
I continue to engage in my own therapy and supervision as well as continuing education to keep me up-to-date on techniques that benefit my work with clients.
How do your core values shape your approach to therapy?
My core values center on respect for individual choice in the lifestyles of my clients. I respect boundaries and privacy as well as strict confidentiality and I encourage self-determination in the choices my clients make in relationships, careers, and various personal matters.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
During the pandemic, I was challenged by and excited about finding ways to meet virtually with my clients, many of whom I had been working with for many years. It is gratifying to note that most of them have stayed in treatment. This also includes a group who have been together since 2013.
“This usually gets them to discuss what they really need to discuss as they feel comfortable doing so.”