Toby Schwartz profile picture

Toby Schwartz Psychotherapy, LCSW

Not Taking New Clients

Toby Schwartz specializes in eating disorders, body dysmorphia, intuitive eating, Health at Every Size, anxiety disorders, early childhood trauma, relational difficulties, and general mental health. She utilizes an integrative approach that focuses on what is happening in the present while understanding the past to identify what is at the core of the presenting issue.

Specialties
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Life Transitions
  • Eating Disorders and Body Image
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
  • Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Pay with insurance
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Cigna
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Harvard Pilgrim
Pay out-of-pocket
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • Sliding scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
mic icon
Provider
Profile
“My demeanor is approachable, friendly, and casual, which has allowed clients to feel comfortable talking to me.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
After receiving my master’s degree at New York University's School of Social Work in May of 2009, I was employed at a community-based mental health clinic for seven years. I received excellent supervision and experience with a variety of mental health concerns, ages, genders, and ethnicities. In 2013, I started my private practice on a part-time basis, going full-time in April of 2019. I have received specialized training and supervision in trauma and eating disorders and have completed courses and supervision in CBT, DBT, and mindfulness. I am a highly empathic person, which allows me to provide a space for people to express all their feelings without judgment. My demeanor is approachable, friendly, and casual, which has allowed clients to feel comfortable talking to me. I am intuitive, insightful, and proficient in reading body language, which allows me to understand what is not being said in the room and help identify what is at the core of the presenting issue.
What should someone know about working with you?
The first step is an initial phone call, which allows me to know what is bringing you to therapy and answer any questions you may have. The second step is to schedule a full consultation. I recommend 2-3 sessions to determine if it feels like we would be a good fit. I do not have an agenda, and my approach is dependent on the needs of the client. Generally speaking, I focus on the presenting issue while exploring past experiences and relationships to identify what is underneath. It is important to understand what is at the core to make any changes. I will incorporate emotional regulation, mindfulness, and grounding exercises when needed.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
I want to continue to grow as a clinician by studying the latest research on psychotherapy, mental health, and eating disorder treatment. I am planning to focus more on continuing my education in exposure therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy in order to specialize in OCD. I collaborate with a supervisor and colleagues to discuss areas where I struggle in order to better help my clients.
How do your core values shape your approach to therapy?
I experienced a number of difficulties and tragedies as a child and young adult, which has helped me develop sensitivity and empathy and helps me better understand what my clients are going through. I am sensitive to the cultural needs of people and will ask questions when I want to better understand a person's experience. I do not allow my personal judgments and biases to come into therapy and will explore them in my own supervision.
“I am intuitive, insightful, and proficient in reading body language, which allows me to understand what is not being said in the room and help identify what is at the core of the presenting issue.”