Tzvi Noble profile picture

Tzvi Noble Psychotherapy, LMFT

Rabbi Tzvi Noble believes we all have challenges and difficulties along the way. He is available to help you stop living a life of default and start living a life of design and productivity!

Specialties
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Depression
  • ADD/ADHD
  • Addiction and Substance Misuse
  • Bipolar Disorder
Pay with insurance
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
Pay out-of-pocket
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $80-140
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“My first job is to understand you and where you are coming from, both in terms of culture and mindset.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I was initially ordained as a rabbi. I decided that becoming a licensed therapist would add to my ability to help and counsel others.
What should someone know about working with you?
My first job is to understand you and where you are coming from, both in terms of culture and mindset. I then help you identify where you want to be in life, what’s holding you back, and what kind of plan you need to get you where you want to go!
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
Although I consider myself a competent and highly-skilled clinician, I am fully cognizant of the importance of collaborating with mentors and colleagues to gain a sharper understanding of the topic under discussion.
How do your core values shape your approach to therapy?
I was first taught an important lesson: DO NOT JUDGE ANOTHER BEFORE WALKING A MILE IN HIS SHOES! This is crucial to any relationship and certainly as a therapist!
Have you done any research-based work that you found particularly exciting? How does it inform your practice today?
I have done a lot of reading on the effects of childhood trauma and neglect and how these can affect a person many years later.
Is taking medication important in mental health treatments?
Medication can be an important part of mental health treatment. However, it should be viewed as an adjunct to and not a replacement for therapy.
“I then help you identify where you want to be in life, what’s holding you back, and what kind of plan you need to get you where you want to go!”
Interested in speaking with Tzvi?