Vanessa Conti profile picture

Vanessa Conti Psychotherapy, LMHC

Not Taking New Clients

Vanessa Conti has been in mental health for over a decade. She is trained in various models that allow her to treat people at all levels of distress, from chronic to acute. She has experience in hospitals, community mental health, and private practice. She has specialized training in treating the underlying trauma of common presenting issues.

Specialties
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
  • Marriage and Partnerships
  • Religion and Spirituality
  • Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $80-140
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Harvard Pilgrim
  • Out-of-pocket
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“In my own life, I have faced a multitude of adversity and have had to do the hard work in therapy to move through it.”
What should someone know about working with you?
I work relationally and experientially from an attachment-based, emotion-focused, and trauma-informed lens that supports the development of safety and connection in the space I share with clients. This allows clients to express emotions, tell their story, and access the wounds of all ages that need healing. As a Christian, I also integrate biblical principles and values into my work. From our first session, my primary goal is to build a relationship with the people coming to me for care. From there, we will work together to get really curious about emotions and experiences and ultimately find and heal the core wounds that are maintaining the struggles that led my clients to counseling.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
At this point in my practice, I plan to further my clinical training in AEDP and EFT, which are both evidence-based, relational, and experiential models that allow for transformative change to take place. I also plan to attend annual conferences through the American Association for Christian Counselors, which offers a variety of workshops to build competencies around the integration of secular and biblical principles in clinical counseling.
How do your own core values shape your approach to therapy?
I have the experience of being both the clinician and the client. In my own life, I have faced a multitude of adversity and have had to do the hard work in therapy to move through it. I often find that this enables me to connect meaningfully and personally with clients, which helps support the feeling of safety in the space I share with them. Safety and connection are necessary for healing and growth to take place.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
Teletherapy has made mental health counseling much more accessible, which has been such a need for so long. Asking for help is scary on its own and in some ways I think telehealth assists with the removal or breaking down of psychological, emotional, and physical barriers that can make it even harder to commit to therapy. Many of the clients I treated throughout the pandemic enjoyed being able to be in therapy from the comfort of their home or wherever they are at the time of session. Some have even noticed a greater sense of ease, allowing them to engage in the therapeutic work more meaningfully.
“I often find that this enables me to connect meaningfully and personally with clients, which helps support the feeling of safety in the space I share with them.”