Ashley Fargnoli profile picture

Ashley Fargnoli Psychotherapy, LCPC

Ashley Fargnoli is a dance/movement therapist and psychotherapist specializing in working with populations who have experienced trauma as well as those who are living with OCD. She has worked alongside refugees, immigrants, and survivors of intimate partner violence. Ashley has additional training in yoga-informed psychotherapy, sensorimotor psychotherapy, and ERP.

Ashley Fargnoli is a dance/movement therapist and psychotherapist specializing in working with populations who have experienced trauma as well as those who are living with OCD. She has worked alongside refugees, immigrants, and survivors of intimate…

Ashley Fargnoli is a dance/movement therapist and psychotherapist specializing in working with populations who have experienced trauma as well as those who are living with OCD. She has worked alongside refugees, immigrants, and survivors of intimate partner violence. Ashley has additional training in yoga-informed psychotherapy, sensorimotor psychotherapy, and ERP.

Specialties
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
  • Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Pay with insurance
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Cigna
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • AllSavers UHC
  • Harvard Pilgrim
  • Meritain
  • Nippon
  • United Healthcare Shared Services
  • Allied Benefit Systems - Aetna
  • Surest (Formerly Bind)
  • Health Plans Inc.
  • UnitedHealthcare Global
Pay with a program
  • Optum Live & Work Well (EAP)
Pay out-of-pocket
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • Sliding scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
Locations
  • Offers virtual sessions
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • California
  • Illinois
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Provider
Profile
“I’m very passionate about working alongside other helping professionals (therapists, doctors, caregivers) to address the effects of secondary and vicarious trauma and promote vicarious resilience and well-being.”
What was your path to becoming a Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor?
As a dancer since the age of four, I’ve always tried to find a way to bridge my passion for dancing with helping others. I started collaborating on dance-based reconciliation projects in the Balkans and then traveled to India where I volunteered with the organization Kolkata Sanved, which uses dance/movement therapy (DMT) with survivors of human trafficking and abuse. It was in India where I first learned about DMT. Shortly after, I decided to enroll in graduate school to begin my official journey to become a licensed psychotherapist and board-certified dance/movement therapist.
What should someone know about working with you?
I’m very passionate about working alongside other helping professionals (therapists, doctors, caregivers) to address the effects of secondary and vicarious trauma and promote vicarious resilience and well-being. I've found that bringing some of my key personality traits, such as lightness and humor, into my sessions has helped facilitate growth and healing in many of my clients, especially those who have experienced complex trauma. When working alongside people with OCD, homework is a big part of exposure and response prevention treatment, and we will work closely together to gradually address your fears.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
The incorporation of the body in mental health treatment, in particular for clients who have experienced trauma, has been a necessary and exciting evolution in this field. As a psychotherapist who values and honors the body's responses to trauma and stress, the openness to body-based modalities has been transformational.
Have you done any research-based work that you found particularly exciting? How does it inform your practice today?
I am honored to have published two peer-reviewed articles and one book chapter (Chapter 1: Dance/Movement Therapy for Trauma Survivors) within the past few years. My research focuses on the self and collective care of community-based mental health providers and the incorporation of Indigenous and cultural healing practices in therapy. The lived experience of both working and researching cross-culturally has greatly informed the way I approach my practice while striving toward cultural humility and decentering my privilege.
“I've found that bringing some of my key personality traits, such as lightness and humor, into my sessions has helped facilitate growth and healing in many of my clients, especially those who have experienced complex trauma.”
Next available Saturday