Jen Wittlin, LCSW
Jen Wittlin profile picture

Jen Wittlin

Psychotherapy, LCSW

Not Taking New Clients
Jen Wittlin has been a social worker for over 20 years, specializing in foster care, adoption, and family systems. This has translated to a private practice that involves work with those experiencing depression, anxiety, life transitions, and loss. Her practice is trauma-informed and grounded in an understanding of the impact of oppression on individuals and families.
Specialties
General Mental Health
Personal Growth
Relationship Issues
Locations
Finances
$ $ $ $ $
$200-260
Sliding Scale
A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
UnitedHealthcare
Oxford Health Plans
Oscar
Out-of-pocket
portrait photograph of provider
Provider
Profile
“Therapy is a space for you to explore self-discovery, open yourself to increased self-awareness, shift troublesome thought patterns, tap into your intuition, and deepen self-acceptance.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I was born into a lineage of social workers and my own path led me there too. I have always been oriented towards uplifting others and creating space for others to be seen and heard. I received my MSW in 1997 and my training has centered around trauma-informed care, attachment theory, and mindfulness.
What should someone know about working with you?
I view therapy as a collaborative process that is grounded in a trusting alliance between therapist and client. Therapy is a space for you to explore self-discovery, open yourself to increased self-awareness, shift troublesome thought patterns, tap into your intuition, and deepen self-acceptance. Therapy can also lead to a better understanding of how you relate to others and what you need in your relationships. My intention is to offer a warm, open, and safe environment and I believe that the relationship forged between therapist and client is central to healing. Currently, I am working remotely and I offer a complimentary initial phone call to determine if working together would be a good match for both of us.
Jen Wittlin photo 1
How does collaboration with other providers inform your work?
It’s my nature to approach work collaboratively and I believe that the unity of a team is the best practice. I participate in clinical supervision, which affords me additional insight and new perspectives that allow me to deepen my clinical work. If I am doing family work, I often speak to individual therapists of family members in order to ensure our goals are in alignment. I also collaborate with psychiatrists and other members of a client’s clinical team. I believe strongly in transparency with respect to collateral work and will share with my client when I speak to any of their other providers. It’s crucial that clients trust the therapeutic process and that they feel like an essential collaborator on their own team.
What advice would you give to someone who is hesitant to try therapy?
Therapy is one of many modalities available to those who are seeking healing of some kind. In order for it to be most effective, it is best if you come to it with a willingness to do the work you want to do. If you decide you want to try therapy, you should know you are in the driver’s seat: You get to decide if someone is the right match for you and you get to decide if it’s working for you. You can always decide that therapy is not right for you and that’s okay. But, when therapy feels right, it is one of the best gifts of self-care that you can give yourself.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
I have been particularly interested in recent research on brain development and how much more we are learning about neuroscience, especially in respect to trauma. Related to this is my interest in holistic frameworks and incorporating a wider lens when looking at options for healing. In particular, I’m interested in work that involves the body, such as breathwork and mindfulness. These perspectives help to normalize the human experience and destigmatize the experience of being non-neurotypical. I want those looking for therapy to know there are many options rather than one path to healing.
“My intention is to offer a warm, open, and safe environment and I believe that the relationship forged between therapist and client is central to healing.”