Kate Segal profile picture

Kate Segal Psychotherapy, PhD

Kate Segal is clinical psychologist who has trained at Cornell, NYU, and Montefiore Medical Center in a variety of approaches, including CBT, psychodynamic, emotionally-focused therapy (EFT), attachment-informed, and DBT. She prioritizes creating an authentic, warm, and nonjudgmental environment for clients to grow, heal, and develop the lives they deserve.

Specialties
  • Depression
  • Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
  • Marriage and Partnerships
  • Religion and Spirituality
  • Addiction and Substance Misuse
Pay out-of-pocket
  • $ $ $ $ $
    >$260
Locations
  • Offers virtual sessions
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
mic icon
Provider
Profile
“I learned that no matter how traumatic a person’s past, there is a perseverance to continue to live and improve one's life, especially among some of the most stigmatized groups with comorbid medical and psychological illness.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I was born and raised in New York City and have always been fascinated by the heterogeneity that characterizes the city’s population. Where I am from deeply influenced my lifelong interest in human behavior, which evolved into my interest in psychology. Through my years of clinical training, I have consistently been moved by people's desire to improve their lives despite many personal, socioeconomic, and medical adversities and the inner strength this demonstrated. I learned that no matter how traumatic a person’s past, there is a perseverance to continue to live and improve one's life, especially among some of the most stigmatized groups with comorbid medical and psychological illness. There are people struggling to locate this strength and I want to help them find it.
What should someone know about working with you?
I provide an authentic, warm, and nonjudgmental environment for clients to grow, heal, and develop the life they deserve. Starting with an in-depth intake, I work in partnership and collaboratively with couples and individuals to identify therapy goals and potential interventions. I refer to relevant literature and evidence-based treatments that have been effective in symptom reduction to create a custom treatment plan for each client. I monitor the progress of symptom reduction using weekly self-reported measures and clinical observation. Depending on the treatment plan, in-between session work may be assigned. I have experience working with clients and couples from a wide range of racial, ethnic, religious, sexual orientation and gender identity, socioeconomic, and educational backgrounds. I’ve worked with children and adults.
How do your core values shape your approach to therapy?
Growing up as a bisexual, secular Jew in New York City and working in hospital settings in the Bronx for 10 years have taught me the critical role a person’s background plays when developing case conceptualization and understanding the client’s symptoms and response to treatment. I am continually aware of how being mindful of and addressing my implicit biases and white privilege affects the therapeutic process. Working to recognize, understand, and work through these biases as an antiracist human is invaluable to building strong rapport with clients whose backgrounds can be vastly different from mine. It also enhances my ability to help clients make life-changing insights.
Have you done any research-based work that you found particularly exciting? How does it inform your practice today?
While determining my dissertation topic, I coordinated a study examining smoking behaviors in people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) and provided psychotherapy to clients at an outpatient substance use treatment program in the Bronx. I noticed both the participants and my clients were enormously affected by and internalized the stigma associated with HIV/AIDS and substance use. This stigma negatively affected their quality of life and reducing internalized stigma was the target of therapy with several clients. I found little literature on the relationship between internalized HIV stigma (IHAS) and smoking behaviors in PLWHA, despite the high prevalence of both smoking and IHAS in this population. My dissertation explored the relationship between IHAS and smoking behaviors in PLWHA. The topic of stigma’s negative impact on people is more relevant than ever. As a therapist, I strive to help clients develop a level of self-compassion that transcends stigma.
Tell us about your specialized training as a couples therapist in emotionally-focused therapy?
I am in the process of becoming certified in emotionally-focused therapy for couples. I feel my most authentic as a therapist when I practice EFT, which is grounded in the belief that everyone deserves and craves connection. EFT is an evidence-based therapy that is supported by research that has been shown to significantly improve relationships and lead couples to feel safe and connected to one another. Couples often present with a desire to improve their relationship because they are arguing frequently, feel disconnected or alone, and lack trust in their partner. Through the use of EFT, I form a strong alliance with both members of the couple with a focus on authenticity, empathic attunement, acceptance, and collaboration. I help couples work through painful negative cycles of disconnection to restore and create a sense of closeness, connection, intimacy, and safety with the person in their life that matters the most: Their partner. At the start of our couples work, you will meet as a couple to get a sense of areas where you want to focus. Then I will meet individually with each partner to get a sense of your goals and attachment history. We will then meet together again, at which point I will share with you my feedback and then we will begin the EFT therapy sessions.
“There are people struggling to locate this strength and I want to help them find it.”
Interested in speaking with Kate?