Kelly Price profile picture

Kelly Price Psychotherapy, LMHC

Kelly Price is a psychotherapist working with adults and adolescents struggling with trauma and eating disorders and their associated symptoms of anxiety and depression. She believes in an integrative approach that focuses on increasing the strengths of the individual and helping people to live their lives according to their priorities and values.

Specialties
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Depression
  • Eating Disorders and Body Image
  • Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • Self-Harm and Suicidal Feelings
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $80-140
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Harvard Pilgrim
  • Out-of-pocket
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“I place an emphasis on wanting to see individuals build lasting compassion, courage, confidence, connectedness, calmness, curiosity, clarity, and creativity in all aspects of their lives.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I feel as though I am a natural born therapist. From a young age, I had an innate curiosity about people and the thought process behind why they do the things they do. I was always asking questions and my strength has always been getting to the core values of a person. I’ve always had a high level of sensitivity toward the emotions of others and a need to help those who I see struggling. I have always been drawn toward the field of trauma as I saw, through my friends and in my own family system, the devastating impact that trauma can have on an individual and a family. I have worked in a psychiatric hospital with trauma treatment at the forefront, a community clinic with impoverished individuals with generational and long-term systemic trauma, and in a partial hospitalization program for people with eating disorders where their struggle was directly connected to the traumatic experiences they endured.
What should someone know about working with you?
I am a therapist who works well with clients who are collaborative in the process. I place an emphasis on wanting to see individuals build lasting compassion, courage, confidence, connectedness, calmness, curiosity, clarity, and creativity in all aspects of their lives. I am someone who will provide education, encourage expression of your ideas, utilize humor and connection, and help you connect to your emotions in a way that feels safe and empowering. We will start our sessions by identifying what thoughts, feelings, and sensations are problematic for you and then setting goals around them. I encourage participants to work outside of treatment and will offer prompted questions designed to help clients make meaningful change in their lives.
How do your own core values shape your approach to therapy?
My core values of prioritizing the strengths of others and being a helper shape my therapy in allowing me to recognize aspects of people that they cannot see for themselves and be an advocate who helps them live the lives they are wanting.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
I am most excited about the decrease in the mental health stigma and the increase in encouragement toward individuals finding the mental health care they need. Having a mental illness is nothing to be ashamed of and seeking out treatment is a sign of strength as it takes tremendous courage to look into ourselves. I am hopeful that the mental health stigma will continue to decrease and that the average person will no longer feel shame when asking for help.
Have you done any research-based work that you found particularly exciting? How does it inform your practice today?
I have been working on my trauma certification and have looked into the long-term and lasting impact of trauma on our brains and on our ability to process events in our lives.
What advice would you give someone starting therapy for the first time?
Being able to feel connected, seen, and heard in therapy is vital. This is a time for you to express yourself freely and be guided in a way that allows you to connect to yourself and build the skills needed to live a life worth living.
“I am someone who will provide education, encourage expression of your ideas, utilize humor and connection, and help you connect to your emotions in a way that feels safe and empowering.”
Interested in speaking with Kelly?