Lindsay Karabelas profile picture

Lindsay Karabelas Psychotherapy, PsyD

Not Taking New Clients

Lindsay Karabelas is a New York-licensed psychologist who works primarily with adolescents and adults. She uses a cognitive behavioral approach in order to help lessen the impact of negative emotions on daily life. She also offers skills to help foster emotion regulation, coping strategies, and adaptive behaviors.

Lindsay Karabelas is a New York-licensed psychologist who works primarily with adolescents and adults. She uses a cognitive behavioral approach in order to help lessen the impact of negative emotions on daily life. She also offers skills to help fos…

Lindsay Karabelas is a New York-licensed psychologist who works primarily with adolescents and adults. She uses a cognitive behavioral approach in order to help lessen the impact of negative emotions on daily life. She also offers skills to help foster emotion regulation, coping strategies, and adaptive behaviors.

Specialties
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Depression
  • Life Transitions
  • Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
Pay with insurance
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Cigna
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
Pay with a program
  • Optum Live & Work Well (EAP)
Pay out-of-pocket
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • Sliding scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
Locations
  • Offers virtual sessions
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“Being a therapist is rewarding to me because I realize the role that emotions can play in our daily lives.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
My path to becoming a therapist began after college when I was not sure what I wanted the rest of my life to look like. After some searching and several other jobs, I found exactly what I was looking for. I wanted a career that would provide me the ability to make a meaningful contribution and change the lives of others. I started out at Adelphi University, where I received a master’s degree in psychology, and then went on to Hofstra University to complete my doctorate. My internship and postdoctoral fellowship were focused on cognitive behavioral therapy, and I continue to practice that modality in my sessions. In addition, I incorporate mindfulness and meditation into many of my sessions.
What should someone know about working with you?
Intakes are structured to gain as much information as possible about past and current life experiences and what brought a client into therapy. After this is established, a treatment hierarchy is created in order to collaboratively determine what issues are interfering with life in the most meaningful ways and what issues need immediate change. Throughout the course of sessions, we will work through the issues that are affecting the client's cognitions, emotions and behaviors, as well as provide a safe space to discuss any new issues in a confidential and collaborative way. Being a therapist is rewarding to me because I realize the role that emotions can play in our daily lives. The way that we perceive life events can have a major impact on our levels of happiness, and I am a big believer in the fact that we all have the right and the responsibility to find the life that works best for us and find our own unique brand of happiness.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
I am most excited about the constantly changing way that therapy is talked about as well as the increased accessibility of mental health services through telehealth. It is becoming more common to talk about therapy and to value working on yourself and your happiness, and I think this is a wonderful development. If we value and honor ourselves, we have the potential to change our whole world, and I am so happy to see more people doing that. In addition, the growing popularity of telehealth has made it easier for people to access mental health services, which benefits not only the client themselves but every aspect of their lives.
“The way that we perceive life events can have a major impact on our levels of happiness, and I am a big believer in the fact that we all have the right and the responsibility to find the life that works best for us and find our own unique brand of happiness.”