Maria Boncyk profile picture

Maria Boncyk Psychotherapy, LCSW

Maria Boncyk takes a holistic and trauma-informed approach to working with adults. It’s not uncommon for overwhelming feelings to be natural reactions to situations or experiences that are unnatural. Her focus is on healing, processing, and building resilience to help you feel more confident about your future.

Specialties
  • LGBTQIA+
  • Race and Ethnicity
  • Domestic Abuse and Violence
  • Schizophrenia & Psychotic Disorders
  • Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $200-260
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Out-of-pocket
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“I chose the profession of social work out of all the therapeutic approaches because it is based on the principle that we can understand a person in the broader context of their physical and emotional environment and experiences.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
Before becoming a therapist, I was a journalist. I have always been interested in people's stories, how we perceive things, what drives our decisions, and what we do. As a therapist, I have curiosity about you and there is no judgment about your past, your experiences, or your feelings. I have experience in outpatient therapy clinics as well as experience working in more intensive settings with people living with severe mental illnesses. My therapeutic foundation is in trauma and attachment theory, where we look at relationships and experiences and how they may affect you today. I have completed EMDR basic and intermediate training as well as training in dialectical behavior therapy, narrative therapy, and child-parent psychotherapy. I am also a YTT 200-hour certified yoga instructor, which informs my work by examining somatic experiences and integrating mindfulness (if that is something you are interested in exploring).
What should someone know about working with you?
My style is very relational. Our initial session will be an assessment where we'll have a conversation about what brings you to therapy and what you'd like to change while I gather pertinent family, health, and treatment history. As with any practice where you want to make a change, there is work to do outside of sessions. This is important for consistency and for integrating our work into your daily life. We will discuss what kind of outside assignment feels useful and aligns with your style and broader goals. A simple example of homework with me could be 5-10 minutes per day of guided meditation to practice mindfulness.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
I've had great luck and worked with brilliant colleagues with varied areas of focus and perspectives. I continue to get peer support and consultation with them to support my continued growth as a therapist and clinician. I also attend conferences and formal training. I am working toward EMDRIA certification as an EMDR practitioner, which means regular EMDR consultation to support the therapy I am providing. EMDR is my primary approach, and I am happy to answer questions about this kind of psychotherapy if you're curious.
How do your core values shape your approach to therapy?
I chose the profession of social work out of all the therapeutic approaches because it is based on the principle that we can understand a person in the broader context of their physical and emotional environment and experiences. This includes the social and cultural settings we're in, how the way we identify and others identify us impacts our sense of safety, how we are perceived, and what opportunities we have. It is important to our relationship and our work to discuss how all this affects you in your life and how it may affect our therapeutic connection.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
I am very excited about the exploration of psychedelics in the world of mental health. This class of pharmaceuticals has long been taboo in Western medicine, and I am excited that there is a push for more research into this area. The data we have now shows that psychedelics can help ease mental health symptoms and suffering when other modalities and interventions have been ineffective. Currently, psychedelics are not something I utilize in my practice, but I am excited to see what the research shows us in the coming years.
“This includes the social and cultural settings we're in, how the way we identify and others identify us impacts our sense of safety, how we are perceived, and what opportunities we have.”
Interested in speaking with Maria?