Novella Moffitt profile picture

Novella Moffitt Psychotherapy, LMHC

Novella Moffitt is a licensed mental health counselor who works primarily with adults from multicultural communities. Her practice is an integrative blend of psychodynamic, cognitive behavioral, and dialectical behavior therapies. Novella uses a trauma-informed, culturally-competent, strengths-based, and client-centered approach to focus on personal growth and empowerment.

Specialties
  • General Mental Health
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Life Transitions
  • Bipolar Disorder
  • Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $80-140
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Out-of-pocket
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • Florida
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Provider
Profile
“As I am client-centered, every few months I will ask how my particular therapeutic approach is working for you and what modifications I can make to help ensure your success in achieving your goals.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I wanted to help people from a very early age. As an empathetic listener, it's always been amazing being able to help people with issues that I myself have struggled with at various points in childhood through adulthood and eventually overcame. I have worked in community mental health for several years, working with clients of all ages, races, ethnicities, occupations, income levels, and family types. My experience in community mental health helps me to be able to efficiently recognize diagnostic symptoms regardless of client background, ultimately providing a more accurate initial diagnosis and the best recommendations for treatment.
What should someone know about working with you?
In the intake appointment, I will ask a host of questions, collecting your biological, psychological, and social history in order to get a general understanding of your background and potentially identify triggers and roots of your reasons for coming to therapy. Follow-up appointments will increasingly become more collaborative as I get to know more about you and become able to make more individualized recommendations. Because progress looks different for different people and for different issues, I work with you in the first two sessions to identify your overall goal. Every few sessions, I will empower you to gauge your own progress toward your goals. I assign homework as needed to further progress. As I am client-centered, every few months I will ask how my particular therapeutic approach is working for you and what modifications I can make to help ensure your success in achieving your goals.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
I like to participate in continuing education courses about trauma and anxiety. I am always excited to learn new information and therapeutic techniques and put them into practice. Collaborating with other providers also provides me with different perspectives that may challenge and subsequently improve my own current therapeutic techniques.
How do your own core values shape your approach to therapy?
I strive to change the narrative about Black and Latino mental health from all perspectives. Growing up, mental health treatment within the Black and Latino community was seen as something reserved only for the severely mentally ill and even then, mental health treatment was oftentimes still seen as unnecessary. Mental health issues of the Black and Latino community are still today too often minimized, disregarded, or treated through the lens of ignorant stereotypes. If the above mentioned client is also a member of the LGBTQIA community, they may have been disparaged or had their experiences discounted by some professionals or potentially harmed physically and emotionally by friends and family. When the above mentioned clients come in for treatment, I use supportive words to make it clear that their mental health matters too and that they themselves matter too.
“I strive to change the narrative about Black and Latino mental health from all perspectives.”
Interested in speaking with Novella?