Rachel Lewis profile picture

Rachel Lewis Psychotherapy, LMHC

Rachel Lewis has over 20 years of clinical experience working in behavioral health. She believes that people are resilient and that resilience becomes our beacon to self-discovery and emotional healing. She also believes that everyone has the power to live the life they want and tailors her counseling and support to help foster the healing and empowerment process.

Specialties
  • General Mental Health
  • Personal Growth and Self-Esteem
  • Marriage and Partnerships
  • LGBTQIA+
  • Race and Ethnicity
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $80-140
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Out-of-pocket
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“I strongly believe in the therapeutic alliance that occurs as the client is supported and empowered.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I have always enjoyed helping others and becoming a therapist was a natural path for me. Learning about mental illness and helping others repair their mental health as a treatable process excited me. I learned that this process leads to self-discovery, healing, and empowerment. We are living in times where people feel lost and misunderstood, but treatment works and mental health professionals can help.
What should someone know about working with you?
When working with clients, I provide a brief intake process to get to know you a bit. Once we complete the intake session, we will establish the frequency of our sessions. I recommend that clients commit to at least 90 days of therapy to work on improvement and growth. However, this is not a requirement, just a clinical recommendation. I strongly believe in the therapeutic alliance that occurs as the client is supported and empowered. In addition to the therapeutic work that will be done in sessions, it is also important to encourage educational resources and therapeutic assignments to help promote continued growth and understanding.
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
I believe in ongoing educational training and research to maintain my competency as a therapist. I network with other licensed therapists, psychologists, psychiatrists, and psychiatric nurse practitioners to assist with collaboration and professional growth.
How do your core values shape your approach to therapy?
My worldview on therapy goes back to the life of my grandmother and her experiences with what it meant to support others and be part of the healing process. She was a trailblazer for her time and empowered others to seek their purpose and to find their own voice. She faced racial trauma, sexist views, and economic abuse but it did not stop her from doing the work she did before she left this earth at the age of 98.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
I am excited that therapy is becoming accessible to clients in the form of teletherapy or in-office sessions. Telehealth allows therapy to be flexible, portable, connective, and effective while adapting to the needs and lifestyle requirements of busy humans dealing with the chaos of the world.
Have you done any research-based work that you found particularly exciting? How does it inform your practice today?
I opened the first bilingual outpatient clinic program in Albany, New York. This program was a satellite clinic that became a full-service outpatient clinic program that provided counseling, case management, and medical and medication services. The data used in this program helped to build the template for future bilingual outpatient programs in New York and Puerto Rico. I was also a partner in the REACT SAMHSA research grant program. The study measured and examined the importance of early intervention of medication-assisted therapy for high-risk populations housed in the Albany County Jail. I was the chairwomen for the Police and Race Task Force committee for Fulton and Montgomery counties as well. This task force gathered data through research with community leaders and law enforcement agencies and provided educational support to address implicit bias and promote understanding of racial inequality.
“In addition to the therapeutic work that will be done in sessions, it is also important to encourage educational resources and therapeutic assignments to help promote continued growth and understanding.”
Interested in speaking with Rachel?