Rachel Pauker Fryd profile picture

Rachel Pauker Fryd Psychotherapy, LMHC

Rachel Pauker Fryd is a psychotherapist who specializes in anxiety, life transition adjustment, stress, and maternal mental health. She utilizes a dynamic approach with elements of cognitive behavioral and client-centered therapies to help each person achieve their goals. She graduated from Columbia University with a master’s degree in counseling psychology.

Specialties
  • General Mental Health
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Life Transitions
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
  • Women’s Mental Health (Pregnancy, Infertility and Post-Partum)
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
  • Out-of-pocket
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“I enjoy working with a diverse population of highly-motivated individuals who are seeking a space to be supported as they learn and grow and I am passionate about helping people find and connect to a strong internal narrative.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
For as long as I can remember, I wanted to become a therapist. I have always held a personal value around the importance of acknowledging and expressing one's thoughts, feelings, and reactions. As a natural helper and believer in the power of self-exploration and growth, I sought real world settings where I could hone my skills and grow as a therapist. After my graduate training at Columbia University, I worked for several years in the New York City homeless shelter system. After that, I joined a group therapy practice in Midtown Manhattan where I had the opportunity to work with individuals and couples for nearly six years. I believe my work in diverse and dynamic settings allows me to connect with and support a wide range of clients. I also draw on my clinical experience from my graduate training at Columbia as well as my postgraduate certificate programs, including one in advanced cognitive behavioral therapy from NYU and one in maternal mental health from the Seleni Institute.
What should someone know about working with you?
I believe we all can benefit from therapy but that therapy can look and feel different for each person. I enjoy working with a diverse population of highly-motivated individuals who are seeking a space to be supported as they learn and grow and I am passionate about helping people find and connect to a strong internal narrative. I take a collaborative but professional approach to my work with you to help tailor specific tools and techniques that will best serve you. From our initial conversation, we will talk about your goals and explore what progress looks like for you. I do believe that clients can be further helped and supported by taking what they learn in session and applying it back into their lives. And so, I often suggest some form of homework or other ways for clients to think about and apply what we have discussed during their time outside of session.
Rachel Pauker Fryd photo 2
What is something you want people to know about therapy?
Unfortunately, too many stigmas around mental health and coming to therapy still exist. Whether you have worked with a therapist before or this is your first time, it can be helpful to know or be reminded of a few things. First of all, this is a safe space; regardless of any therapeutic style or techniques that I may use or teach, my goal first and foremost is to help you feel safe and comfortable from the moment you pick up the phone to talk to me, walk into my office, or click into our virtual session. Creating that comfortable therapeutic alliance is the key to our healthy and effective relationship and your personal growth. It’s also important to know that you are not being judged. My years of experience in the field have taught me that while we might think we are the only ones thinking or feeling something, we so often are not alone in those emotions. It may feel difficult or uncomfortable to talk about certain things but give it time and express yourself. When exploring or answering questions, there is a difference between saying, “I don't know,” and saying, “I don't feel comfortable thinking about that or answering yet.” I will encourage you to sit in the discomfort and we will work on ways to tolerate that as well. There can be so much information and growth in that discomfort. There is no right or wrong answer and no good or bad way of feeling. Honesty and authenticity are not only strengths but necessities in the therapeutic process.
“I take a collaborative but professional approach to my work with you to help tailor specific tools and techniques that will best serve you.”
Interested in speaking with Rachel?