Rachel Ralston, LCSW
Rachel Ralston profile picture

Rachel Ralston

Psychotherapy, LCSW

Not Taking New Clients
Rachel Ralston is a psychotherapist who works with adolescents and young adults navigating life transitions and seeking more fulfillment. Utilizing warmth and compassion, she creates a healing, empowering space to change the stories that no longer serve us. Rachel uses multiple approaches, including CBT, ACT, and mindfulness, to meet the needs of each client.
Specialties
General Mental Health
Personal Growth
Relationship Issues
Finances
$ $ $ $ $
$80-140
UnitedHealthcare
Oxford Health Plans
Oscar
Out-of-pocket
portrait photograph of provider
Provider
Profile
“I found that my strength and calling is creating space for people who need to feel seen—and who are motivated to interact more wholeheartedly with their lives.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
I initially swore I would never be a therapist. While I loved working with people and was passionate about helping them evoke change in their lives (and still am!), I wasn’t quite sold on the value of individual therapy itself. I later found out, through my own experiences and the therapeutic relationships I developed with clients in schools and child welfare, just how powerful and transformative the healing relationship can be. I found that my strength and calling is creating space for people who need to feel seen—and who are motivated to interact more wholeheartedly with their lives.
What should someone know about working with you?
Beginning therapy can feel daunting and overwhelming—the relationship between therapist and client is essential in making the whole process stellar. I offer a phone consultation to answer any questions a client may have about getting started or how I work. I provide a caring therapy environment—one that’s filled with humor, support, empathy, and one that’s judgment-free. My approach utilizes various modes of treatment in order to meet the client's individual needs and determine what’s most helpful. Initial sessions allow me to learn how the client interacts with their lives. We then work collaboratively to explore how thoughts and behaviors are serving them and develop new patterns of living to embrace fulfillment. I am passionate about self-compassion and helping others learn to treat themselves with the kindness they absolutely deserve.
Rachel Ralston photo 1
What advice would you give to someone who is hesitant to try therapy?
Therapy can be beneficial for everyone, at any time—not only when they’re facing a specific crisis or problem. Everyone has mental health and it needs to be taken care of just as much as our physical health. Life is difficult and confusing, and therapy provides a space for ongoing, insightful, and sometimes tough work to walk through life in a more present and meaningful way. I understand the challenge of entering into therapy and the strength it takes to ask for help or to simply want to learn oneself better. What a great gift to give yourself—to have intentional space dedicated to understanding how to live a better life.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
It has been incredibly exciting and uplifting to witness the increase in people discussing mental health issues and prioritizing wellness over shame and silence. Every day, in all arenas, there are people creating space for each other to acknowledge the difficulties and struggles of everyday life. As we become increasingly aware that everyone struggles with their mental health from time to time, asking for help becomes more accessible. There will then, hopefully, be a ripple effect of more compassion, kindness, and empathy toward mental health.
If you could pick one or two books that influenced your approach to therapy, what would they be and why?
I am a voracious reader and love finding new reads in all subject matters that challenge, change, and expand my view of the world and my work. An early influencer in my work was Viktor Frankl’s “Man’s Search for Meaning.” This book changed my perceptions of resilience and ability for hope in humankind. Brene Brown’s “The Gifts of Imperfection” was also groundbreaking for me in how I relate to vulnerability and shame. I’ve used this book (as well as her other great books) as a framework with clients in exploring these topics and concepts of wholehearted living.
“Life is difficult and confusing, and therapy provides a space for ongoing, insightful, and sometimes tough work to walk through life in a more present and meaningful way.”