Rochie Smetana profile picture

Rochie Smetana Psychotherapy, LMHC

Not Taking New Clients

Rochie Smetana works with individuals who are experiencing life transitions, looking to make a change, struggling with relationship issues, or dealing with low self-esteem. She uses a variety of therapeutic techniques, including CBT and psychodynamic therapy. Rochie tailors sessions to help each client discover their personal goals and how to achieve them.

Specialties
  • General Mental Health
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorders
  • Depression
  • Life Transitions
  • General relationship challenges (family, friends, co-workers)
Finances
  • $ $ $ $ $
    $140-200
  • Sliding Scale
    A sliding scale is a range of out of pocket fees that providers accept based on financial need.
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Oxford Health Plans
  • Aetna
  • UMR
  • Oscar
  • UHC Student Resources
  • Harvard Pilgrim
  • Out-of-pocket
Locations
Licensed in
Therapy licenses aren't like driver's licenses — each state has its own set of rules. To offer care, a provider needs to be licensed in the state you're located in when sessions are happening.
  • Florida
  • New York
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Provider
Profile
“Watching clients grow, evolve, and develop reinforces my love and commitment to this field and my belief that therapy, with a lot of hard work, can be life-changing.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist?
Ever since I was very young, I've been interested in understanding people's stories and life experiences. Still, my career path didn’t lead me directly to the therapy world. I spent some years teaching yoga and mindfulness, which deepened my attunement to the needs of those around me. Becoming a therapist felt like the natural next step, giving me the tools to work with others in a profound way. Watching clients grow, evolve, and develop reinforces my love and commitment to this field and my belief that therapy, with a lot of hard work, can be life-changing.
What should someone know about working with you?
Working with me looks different for each client. For some clients, understanding their current patterns based on their background and history can help them build more self-acceptance and self-compassion. For others, identifying and getting comfortable expressing their feelings and their needs can help them improve their relationship with themselves and with their loved ones. There are also clients who benefit from learning and practicing specific skills (such as mindfulness, emotional regulation, or assertiveness) and that becomes the basis of our work together. With all of my clients, the first step in our journey is building trust and safety between us.
Rochie Smetana photo 1
What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?
Continued learning is a big part of growing as a therapist and ensuring that I provide my best care to clients. I take part in group supervision, consult regularly with a highly experienced clinician, and attend frequent trainings on topics and therapeutic modalities that I want to learn more about. Outside of my graduate training, I’ve trained in many valuable therapeutic modalities, including somatic interventions for trauma, DBT (dialectical behavioral therapy), ACT (acceptance and commitment therapy), and IFS (internal family systems). This keeps me inspired about the work that I do, opens me up to new ideas and practices, and helps me continue to improve and evolve as a therapist.
How do your own core values shape your approach to therapy?
One of my core beliefs is the idea that every human being is an entire world that holds immense knowledge, complexity, resources, and value. This guides my work by the way I try to hold space for every client, knowing that they each bring so much with them into the room. We are not just the sum total of all of our experiences, symptoms, or struggles. We each hold tremendous potential and my work allows me to help my clients recognize their own strengths and greatness.
What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?
I’m excited that therapy and mental health are being discussed in so many forums and that resources are easier to access. Mental health professionals like Brene Brown and Esther Perel brought mental health to the masses with their Ted Talks, podcasts, and readable books. This provided a gateway for people to consider, talk about, and care for their mental health in a more substantive way. Together, we learned that mental health doesn't mean the absence of mental illness (just like physical health doesn't mean the absence of being sick). If we want to become more emotionally and mentally healthy, it requires learning, reflecting, discussing, and practicing. This is more likely now that there is openness and conversation surrounding these ideas.
“One of my core beliefs is the idea that every human being is an entire world that holds immense knowledge, complexity, resources, and value.”